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  • AndreaS
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    Post count: 51

    It seems you made a small mistake but otherwise it’s all good 🙂 Have a look at the USDA entry for cooked glutinous rice. It lists values for 100g. When you enter “0.87” in the “Value per …g” column you’ll get the values for 87g, and it says 18g carbs.

    yet the rice I have is 100g to 42g carbs?

    Nope, because as you wrote the label said 52g have 42g carbs.

    BTW, food that was cooked is harder to compare because of the fact that water is relatively heavy 🙂 Practically all types of rice have similar raw values (some have more fiber though) of about 350kcal per 100g uncooked rice resulting mostly from 80g carbs (80g * 4kcal/g = 320 kcal, the rest comes from protein, fat + fiber). So, the label of your “Sho-Chiku-Bai” seems correct.

    What differs is the cooked result: 100g rice may easily end up as 200 to more than 400g of cooked rice. Different kinds of rice will give different values, however, the differences due to cooking methods and personal preferences may even be larger. The USDA lists
    cooked long-grain rice and cooked short-grain rice with the same calories: 130kcal/100g — which means 100g uncooked rice resulted in 270g of cooked rice. The value for glutinous rice is 97kcal which means the end result of 100g cooked rice was 381g. Compare this with what you got:

    1 cup [208g] of dry rice makes about 400g of cooked rice

    Roughly, that’d be 200g compared to 381g (unless you actually meant a cup of 100g).

    In short, my advice: If possible relate to raw values.

    I, too, prefer to buy food with nutrition labels. White rice is an exception, though. The nutrition values, as I said, are always the same within a range of +/- 1g. So, I buy sacks of 20kg from Asian specialty shops where I get AAA quality Jasmine rice (often even cheaper than from all-purpose super markets).

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    Please excuse that I’ll keep my reply short. We might very well have similar issues. Fiber (mostly the insoluble kind) is what causes most of my symptoms. However, my advice for you:
    “A little over a week” is too short, relax, stick to the diet and keep a log of what you ate and the symptoms. Yet, if symptoms get worse change the diet composition and/or consult with Norm.
    “Sometimes I finish a meal and immediately I have … symptoms”: Note that these symptoms generally are not caused by what you just ate but by what you were eating up to 2-3 days before. This is very important and helps to stay calm 🙂 The trigger is eating itself (or other activity like drinking, sports, stress), it rarely is a particular type of food with the exception of stuff that is for instance super acidic (and maybe too acidic for healthy people, too) or for people who are allergic (but people who are know in advance).

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51
    in reply to: SMOOTHIES #12002

    Because I’ve just recently discovered it: Coconut milk mixes surprisingly well with avocado. The latter is not particularly FP low, however, it doesn’t need much. When you shop for coconut milk make sure it lists almost no carbs and no fiber. You’ll find recipes easily on the web.

    Keep in mind that typical, not too liquid smoothies like green smoothies often will have medium to high FP. When I started FTD I simply avoided smoothies, instead I was drinking tea and lemon water. But if you don’t mind the high calories of a coconut avocado smoothie or e.g. smoothies with whipped cream, these will have less carbs and less fiber.

    One clever trick to get thick smoothies with low FP: Cook Jasmine rice for about double the time that it usually takes, so about 40-50 minutes. Put some into your smoothie and mix thoroughly.

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    Don’t give up, many, including myself, have seen great improvement of symptoms within a week or two. Maybe you just had a bad start.

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    My gut feeling says you changed your diet too much too fast. Your body is reacting to the quantity of the change, not the quality. If you think that that might very well be the case, start eating again non-FTD friendly food that you have been eating before, and introduce FTD slower. I usually recommend to not change a diet dramatically. Introduce changes over a course of roughly 2 weeks. Keep a diary, and then compare your symptoms of the time before FTD with the symptoms 1-2 weeks after the 2 week introduction.

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    Norm, you mentioned lignin several times in “FTD IBS”. For instance, quoting from the 2013 book edition page 93 f.: “Insoluble fiber includes cellulose (beta-glucan), lignin and some hemicelluloses. Insoluble fiber is believed to increase bulk, soften stools and decrease gut transit time, potentially helping with constipation.” On page 97: “Lignin was not fermented at all.”

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    I don’t strictly exclude chocolate but it’s not part of my regular diet. However, after reading the pages that 49barefoot pointed to I am looking forward to run a “test” where I eat chocolate on a regular basis. Haven’t thought much about it yet, but home-made chocolate with a sweetener or dextrose seems to be an option, too, and sure fun to experiment with 🙂

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    The fermentation potential is roughly the same for plain milk chocolate and dark chocolate (note though that this is only true for plain chocolate). The GI of chocolate increases with the amount of added sugar. Dark chocolate has more cacao solids, less net carbs, less sugar, but higher amounts of fiber, and hence a lower GI. If I do the calculations I get approximately the same FP values, about 32-34g per 100g chocolate.
    So, if one wants to eat less sugar, it’s dark chocolate. If one wants to avoid fiber, milk chocolate is recommended. However, with such a high FP FTD folks won’t eat much chocolate anyway.

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    bearsmom,

    Are you suggesting that the mag supplement is exacerbating the problem?

    Nope, I just wanted to say that I’d not be surprised if it does. Keep goin’ if it works for you! 🙂

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    Norm,

    Bloating, flatulence and cramping have been reported as side effects of mag citrate. Not sure what the mechanism is. Also, staying hydrated is important.

    Actually, that’s what I expected since Mg is often taken to moisture the stool. I doubt that this would only make good bacteria flourish!?

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51
    in reply to: Plain yoghurt #5260

    As I indicated, I do not trust such simplified indexes much. However, Glycemic Index for Sweeteners is a handy overview, and so far the values withstood my checks.
    About Splenda: It is based on sucralose, it is not just sucralose. I don’t know much about Splenda, though. Maybe different kinds of Splenda are sold?
    See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sucralose and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Splenda

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51
    in reply to: Plain yoghurt #5251

    I have compiled a list of scientific sources for GI data at http://andreas.schamanek.net/dw/public:fasttractdiet

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51
    in reply to: Plain yoghurt #5239

    livestrong.com does not provide any references. It’s sad to see so many website pulling GI values from i-don’t-want-to-know-where!
    If you look at the usual scientific sources you’ll see that yoghurt has been tested extensively, however, not natural, unsweetened, full-fat/whole yoghurt. Whereas, full-fat/whole milk has been tested a lot. IIRC, Norm uses a GI of 30 in his book (don’t have it at hand right now) which is a “conservative” value since several tests show even higher values. Now, yoghurt is generally easier on the stomach/intestines than plain milk (as explained in the FTD book). So, a higher GI seems to be justified. And some tests confirm this.
    Sweetened yoghurt should have a higher GI simply because in general it is sweetened with table sugar which has a GI of 65%. If you look at the GI tests data, many show GIs greater than 36. There are also some with lower values. But without knowing the exact ingredients it’s rather pointless to speculate.
    Fortunately, the GI of unsweetened yoghurt is less of an issue since full-fat yoghurt has only 5% or less carbs.

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51
    in reply to: Corn starch #5238

    You see, there is a basic problem with calculating FP values for individual ingredients such as corn starch or wheat flour: GI values are gained from controlled experiments where volunteers actually eat or drink the food to be tested. But you don’t find many volunteers that eat plain corn starch ^_^

    Whereas cornflakes seem to be a favorite food for many. It’s been tested a lot. The values of the U of Sydney database range between 75 and 95. Personally, I assume an average of the GIs of cornflakes for corn starch, so 85%.

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51
    in reply to: Baking & Fast Tract #5232

    What are alternatives to wheat flour? — Good question 🙂 I’m afraid I don’t know many. What I have seen so far (here and elsewhere) has either lots of fiber or lots of carbs or both. Carbs are less of a problem if the GI is high, but the recipes I have seen all had so much carbs that a GI around 75% could already cause troubles. Take for instance 50g French Baguette which has a very high GI and actually a moderate amount of carbs. According to my calculations the FP is 2.9g (at least for the baguette I can buy where I live). The same bread with a GI of 75% would deliver 8.1g FP, that’s way more than double! So, GI is one big problem for alternatives that use for instance potato starch or tapioca starch. Another huge problem is that alternatives (at least the ones I have seen) are much more compact/dense than French Baguette. If you want to put the same slice of cheese on top you’ll likely end up with more grams of “bread”.

    So far I know 3 alternatives that somewhat “work”:
    1) Carb-rich flours with a high GI like Jasmine rice flour.
    2) Bread alternatives (whatever) with lots of air like puffed rice (as used in rice wafer cakes). Unfortunately, these cannot be used for cooking (I tried!;) as they shrink once they get wet and/or hot.
    3) Bread alternatives that are thin like tortilla chips, again due to the reduced weight per serving. Personally, I don’t know any without wheat except the rice flour chips we’ve already discussed. But I guess they do exist. Anyway, with sticky rice these are easy to make.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 47 total)