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  • sivert
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    Post count: 12
    in reply to: Chick Pea flour?? #5286

    Chick peas are listed as high risk in the book (FP is 27 g per 150 g), so it’s probably not a good idea to eat them. Last time I had a small amount of them, I was really sick. I followed the low FODMAP diet at the time, which allows a certain amount – I had about half of that, and that was still way too much.

    But if you are craving pancakes, you could make a pancake batter out of low-FP rice boiled in lactose free milk. When that is cooled off, mix in egg and fry as pancakes. I don’t have a recipe handy, but that’s what is know as “klatkager” in Denmark

    sivert
    Participant
    Post count: 12
    in reply to: Corn starch #5285

    Thanks, that’s a good approximation. I suppose it’s not super important since you only use a small amount in a sauce.

    I’ll try to work up the courage to try tapioca in a sauce…

    sivert
    Participant
    Post count: 12
    in reply to: Plain yoghurt #5284

    Thanks for the link collection Andreas, great resource!

    I don’t eat sweetened yoghurt at all, but I just found it strange that the GI of sweetened and unsweetened yoghurt are so similar. I can see that if the lactose is indeed broken down into galactose and glucose in the final product (despite being listed as lactose) this would make the GI higher. I often use foodcomp.dk and it lists yoghurt (here http://www.foodcomp.dk/v7/fvdb_details.asp?FoodId=0333) as having 2.5 g lactose and 3.8 g total carbohydrate. No glucose listed, though, so that doesn’t really fit with your assumption…

    For me, it’s dangerous to speculate that the FP is lower than what a strict analysis and calculation tells you, because I’m not ever well enough that I can easily tell if I tolerate individual foods or not (I can only slowly guess what my major triggers are)

    sivert
    Participant
    Post count: 12
    in reply to: Plain yoghurt #5242

    As I already wrote, the book’s value is 36. So my question is, if this can really be, since similar values are found for sugar-sweetened yoghurt.

    And I’m not sure what is meant by “usual scientific sources”. Do you have a real reference?

    My question regards plain yogurt, so no ingredients to speculate about.

    sivert
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    I would find it very useful if the app made it possible to make a user setting so that the tables could be shown for 100 g of product or switched to show “portion sizes” according to personal preference.

    Personally, I find it cumbersome that values are calculated for portion sizes that are different size for different products – if they are given for the same weight, you can readily compare FP values without a calculator.

    I know, you Americans are used to checking the fine print and recalculating, but the spoiled Europeans (myself included :o)) are used to having standardized/comparable declarations.

    I would also love to see more ingredients listed in the tables – more useful for people outside the US and for those who cook from scratch instead of consuming industrial products.

    Being able to use the app as a symptom/diet diary makes it much more useful. Maybe fields for liquid intake and exercise per day would make sense too?

    sivert
    Participant
    Post count: 12
    in reply to: Baking & Fast Tract #5191

    Ah yes, I looked in the nuts and snack table. I used the value for almonds since I started with whole almonds. I wonder how the brown exterior layer affects the FP… But I’m also happy with 3.6

    Something else – I realize my previous post may have confused people because it didn’t contain a recipe and this is a recipe thread, and instead was just a question about FP of ingredients. I would find it very helpful if there was a dedicated thread somewhere in the forum only for discussing the calculation of FP for individual ingredients/products. Many times, it’s possible to find different GI values for the same ingredient depending on where you look, so it would be helpful to get other people’s feedback on how they make a given calculation. Granted, there is a lot of useful information in here about FP values, but it’s quite scattered. Just an idea

    sivert
    Participant
    Post count: 12
    in reply to: Baking & Fast Tract #5178

    Yes, I’m aware that my last post did obviously not contain the actual recipe, I did not find it worth the effort to translate and write it when there were so many FP values I couldn’t find…

    The recurring problem, also with the resource you link, Andrea (I had tried that one already) is that they list the GI of a lot of industrial products, but not the actual ingredients. For example, searching that database for “sesame” does not return a value for sesame seeds, only for some products that contain them.

    Without knowing even half of the FP values, though, I would estimate that the FP per slice of the bread I was thinking of would be around 15 or even more.

    Anyway! Today, I tried a different recipe (the bread is cooling off here minus a slice for tasting) which is gluten free and has a moderate FP. I think it has a nice “crumb”, and my recipe says that it is good for toasting. Here it is:

    180 g flax seeds
    70 g almonds
    2 tsp baking powder
    4 large eggs
    0.1 L water
    3 tbsp olive oil
    1 tsp salt

    Heat oven to 170C. In a powerful blender, turn the flax seeds and almonds into a flour. Mix all the ingredients and put them in a bread form. Bake for 30 min and let the bread cool on a rack.
    If my calculation is correct, the FP for the entire bread is 68 g (54 from the flax seeds and 14 from the almonds), so it you cut it in 20 slices, each slice is 3.4 g

    sivert
    Participant
    Post count: 12
    in reply to: Baking & Fast Tract #5167

    Norm,
    I was finally able to go back and look up the gluten free bread recipe I mentioned, but I’m afraid it has a very high FP… I couldn’t calculate it because I’m missing the value for some of the ingredients – I am hoping you may have them or be able to make an educated guess?
    The ingredients in question are:

    quinoa
    sesame seeds
    sunflower seeds
    whole grain rice flakes
    whole grain rice flour
    whole grain corn flour

    They may actually ALL be quite high FP. The recipe also includes buckwheat flour, which is very high. I have no experience substituting these types of flour with something else! Maybe someone in this forum does?

    sivert
    Participant
    Post count: 12
    in reply to: Baking & Fast Tract #4990

    Well, really not much skill is needed to make just plain bread…
    I have tried several different gluten free bread recipes in the past, but it’s much harder because the structure provided by the gluten is missing.

    The best gluten free recipe that I ever found (that used rice and buckwheat flour among other things) used powdered psyllium seed husks to provide the structure, and that will make the FP much higher, as it consists of dietary fiber and nothing else. I could go back and do a rough calculation for that recipe and see if I could substitute some of th high-FP ingredients.

    A propos tapioca starch, I have searched for it in several stores and haven’t found it. At one health food store, they told me that they carried arrowroot instead, but I didn’t buy it because I didn’t know the FP. Is it posted somewhere here in the forums? I couldn’t find it… My Asian shop had tapioca pearls, but that’s not what is meant by tapioca starch, is it?

    sivert
    Participant
    Post count: 12
    in reply to: Baking & Fast Tract #4973

    I also love baking – and I have baked my own bread for years, I don’t think store bought bread tastes any good! I have recently changed my diet to follow Fast Tract (because of IBS), but I get a craving for bread sometimes. My basic bread recipe is this:

    1/2 liter of cold water from the tap
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon dry yeast
    600 g ordinary wheat flour
    Mix it all together and let it rise in the fridge overnight or longer. Using 2 spoons (dough is sticky), put 12 buns on oven plate covered with baking paper, bake at 200C for 20-22 minutes.

    I cut each of the 12 buns in 4 pieces and froze them.

    My wheat flour has 71 g carbohydrates and 4,1 g fiber per 100 g, so using a GI of 70 for white bread (from the book), I find that my 1/4 bun has a FP = 3.2. That seems OK to incorporate in the diet, not every day maybe, but when the craving pops up…

    But I would love to hear from others here if the calculation looks correct

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)