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Viewing 11 posts - 16 through 26 (of 26 total)
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  • Lana
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    Post count: 31

    Norm – you’re funny – “I would like humic and fulvic acid more if I were a plant.” 🙂
    How very interesting that humic and fulvic acids are not fermentable. I just assumed that they were. I wonder if it is the mineral component that is supportive of the bacteria/yeast in the probiotic? As I learn more about fermenting foods at home one of the keys is to give the little creatures enough minerals to grow and reproduce.
    I very much agree with you Norm that there are many unknowns when it comes to messing with the gut microbiota. I think that’s why I’m drawn more to eating fermented foods. They’re teaming with all kinds of beneficial bacteria. It’s such a vast subject.
    I wasn’t planning to research the strains in Prescript Assist – seems like daunting work! You’ve piqued my curiosity though…

    JI, thanks for the link to the suggested probiotics from your naturopath. The Klaire Labs formulas look very interesting.
    This is the probiotic I take – again quite expensive http://www.customprobiotics.com/custom-probiotics-11-strain.htm

    I actually have noticed a difference. My bowel movements are so much more normal since I’ve been taking it. I know it’s the probiotic as I had a few days of loose bowels when I first started (I tend toward constipation) and then a shift to normal which has remained. Gotta love that!

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31
    in reply to: Low FP Ingredients #2535

    I finally found some solid information about waxy maize!

    The company that makes the Elaine Amylopectin Potato Starch has some literature comparing their potato starch to waxy maize. Elaine potato starch has less than 1% Amylose starch and Waxy Maize has less than 4% Amylose starch.
    http://www.agfdt.de/loads/st06/semeiabb.pdf

    I was trying to order some of the Elaine potato starch Norm and I see that there are several types. Did you get a breakdown about their differences? I know you sent me a paper with the info about it but it didn’t make much sense to me so I didn’t keep it. 🙁

    Actually, I don’t know if I can order small quantities. They most likely sell it by the truckload. I’ll probably have to stick with waxy maize for now – but less than 4% isn’t too bad right?

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    I bake with Sweet Rice Flour which is made from sticky (glutinous) rice: http://www.bobsredmill.com/sweet-white-rice-flour.html
    There is 80 grams of carbs in 1/2 cup so if you use it for baking in combination with Dextrose you’d be getting a good punch of carbs.
    The texture of baked goods made with this flour is odd – kind of spongy. I find using a 50/50 mix of sweet rice flour and almond flour gives better results. You can add an extra egg white to dry out the batter as well.
    If you’re eating high carb after a workout you might want the fast absorption but for everyday consumption you might want to add enough fat to slow down those very quickly absorbed carbs. Or eat the baked goods AFTER a high fiber meal (eg. a salad) – fat and fiber slows down absorption of sugars.

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31
    in reply to: Prelief supplement #2396

    Yes, that’s what makes the ‘grains’ more interesting than the powdered culture which only contains a few strains of probiotic.
    As promised, I continued looking and am still not at the bottom of it. 🙂
    I found this site that has more scientific information as well as offering test strips to test the remaining sugars left after a ferment.
    http://www.happyherbalist.com/residualsugartestkit.aspx

    We just have to find our ‘Norm’ of the kefir world and all the answers about kefir will be ours!

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31
    in reply to: Prelief supplement #2389

    Another source for the kefir grains is Cultures for Health. They have the milk grains and the water grains. http://www.culturesforhealth.com/starter-cultures/kefir-cultures.html
    I just participated in a kitchen party on fermenting today so this post is timely. I tried several water kefir recipes and they were quite delicious. I have never made kefir and being the perfectionist that I am I have to learn everything about it before taking the plunge. Something I’ve learned about water kefir (eg. using coconut water or sugar water) that has my brow furrowed is that the bacteria/yeast eat up most of the glucose in the sugar but leave a measure of fructose. What I’ve read is that 80% of the sugar will be eaten by the bacteria/yeast. The remaining 20% of the sugar is fructose which is why the beverage tastes sweet.
    It doesn’t look like you can use all glucose to make a water kefir as it will cause an imbalance in the bacteria/yeast medium. A ratio of 1 part glucose to 2 parts sucrose seems to work well. I’ll be looking into this some more!
    To note: each 8 oz. of water requires 1 tbsp. of sugar to make water kefir which means just over 1/2 tsp. of pure fructose remains in 1 cup of the fermented beverage.

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31
    in reply to: Low FP Ingredients #2348

    Thanks for posting for me Norm! Hopefully everything will work for me next time. Have you heard of waxy maize? What do you think of my hypothesis that it must be high GI if the rats developed insulin resistance?
    What I’ve read is that it is 90% amylopectin. Is that considered very high? Seems to me amylopectin is the dominant starch in grains so don’t know if 90% would be considered high??

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31
    in reply to: Blender Smoothie #2267

    Yes, chocolate is seen as a ‘junk’ food – and a lot of the candy out there deserves that designation. Carob was introduced as a health food and still has that label. I’m not keen on the high fiber content of carob but cocoa is pretty high in fiber too. Chocolate is higher in minerals and has a higher ORAC value than most foods – including blueberries. Just be sure to use cocoa or a chocolate with a high cocoa solids content. I would always choose chocolate – but I’m biased – I’m a chocolatier. 🙂

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    I use enterically coated peppermint oil and it does help. I’ve recently discovered a product called Regimint which is enterically coated peppermint and caraway oil. I buy it here: http://www.iherb.com/product-reviews/Life-Extension-RegiMINT-60-Enteric-Coated-Capsules/11268/?p=2

    I sought it out based on this study that uses enterically coated peppermint and caraway oils successfully: http://www.altmedrev.com/publications/7/5/410.pdf

    I’m not sure if I find it any better than what I had been using. It’s expensive so I combine it with my old one which is enterically coated peppermint, ginger and fennel. I should do a week with just one of them exclusively to see if I notice a difference. The other one is a NOW product and is much cheaper!

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31
    in reply to: Low FP Recipes 1 #2221

    Just tried the rice tonight. It was good! Will do it again. Thanks for the recipe.

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31
    in reply to: Blender Smoothie #2220

    Carob is readily available at Natural Food stores and probably the grocery store as well. Take note that carob is quite high in insoluble fiber… don’t know which fibers in particular. I just figured out the FP for 1 tbsp. of carob powder – 4.5.
    The FP for 1 tbsp. of cocoa powder is 2.8.
    🙂

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31
    in reply to: Hashimoto's #2145

    Have you listened to the Safe Starches seminar? – I found it very interesting and speaks about results similar to yours. Here’s the link: http://vimeo.com/52872503
    I know for thyroid health it’s very important to have adequate carbohydrates. Have you tried carbs that don’t ferment? – the amylopectin based starches – glutinous (sticky) rice, jasmine rice and red potatoes? As Norm says in his book – just chew well when eating starches so the amylase in your saliva can do it’s work in breaking them down!
    Thanks for the info about Rasacea. That’s interesting.

Viewing 11 posts - 16 through 26 (of 26 total)