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  • Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    Silly me – I just noticed that you listed MK7 as a supplement you’re taking!
    So you know all about vitamin K2…
    I’ll leave the info for others. 🙂

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    More often than not, it is the fillers in the supplements that cause issues. There are a few companies that address this. Here are a couple:
    1) Pure Encapsulations – expensive though…
    http://www.pureencapsulations.com/
    2) Dr. Ron’s
    http://www.drrons.com/

    I take Ubiquinol rather than CoQ10. Mercola has a good one with no additives:
    http://products.mercola.com/coq10-ubiquinol/
    Other Ingredients: Medium chain triglycerides, Citrus extract, Capsule (Tilapia Fish Gelatin,Water).

    If you’re taking supplements for cardiovascular health – I have found something that is amazing! I originally was researching for my teeth – and found vitamin K2. The cardiovascular studies on this vitamin are truly impressive. There are 2 forms – MK4 and MK7. Almost everything you find is MK7 but MK4 seems to be better. I buy the Thorne drops and take 2 drops per day. Don’t go by the directions – they advise far too much. 2 drops is plenty. The bottle will last a loooong time. http://www.iherb.com/thorne-research-vitamin-k2-1-fl-oz-30-ml/21592

    Here’s some info on it:
    “Vitamin K2 is a little known but extremely important fat-soluble vitamin. Some coin this nutrient ‘the missing link’.
    In a nutshell, vitamin K2 plays an important role in mineral absorption and metabolism. It helps to move calcium into the proper areas in your body, such as your bones and teeth. It also plays a role in removing calcium from areas where it shouldn’t be, such as in your arteries and soft tissues. K2 is really critical for keeping your bones strong and your arteries clear. Its other main role is to activate proteins that control cell growth. That means K2 has a very important role to play in cancer protection,

    A recent study examined the relationship between K2 (in the form of MK-4 through 10) consumption and heart attack risk in 4,600 Dutch men. They found a strong inverse association between K2 consumption and heart attack mortality risk. Men with the highest K2 consumption had a whopping 51% lower risk of heart attack mortality and a 26% lower risk of death from all causes compared to men eating the least K2.
    Perigord, France is the world’s capital of foie gras, or fatty goose liver. Foie gras turns out to be the richest known source of K2. Perigord also has the lowest rate of cardiovascular mortality in France, a country already noted for its low CVD mortality.
    Rats fed warfarin, a drug that inhibits K2 recycling, develop arterial calcification. Feeding the rats K2 completely inhibits this effect. Mice lacking matrix Gla protein (MGP), a vitamin K-dependent protein that guards against arterial calcification, develop heavily calcified aortas and die prematurely. The link between K2 and cardiovascular disease is a very strong one.

    Vitamin K2, MK-4 is only found in animal products. The best sources known are grass-fed butter from cows eating rapidly growing grass, and foie gras.”

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    An interesting query… I would surmise that because the GI is most often indicative of starches/sugars that readily break down, even with the addition of fat, these starches and sugars are still digesting easily and will therefore be absorbed quicker than other starches and sugars that don’t break down as readily (amylose/fructose). The key, as Norm points out in his book, is to not eat a lot of them at one sitting!
    But then there are those foods like french bread that have a high GI not because of the type of starch but because of the nature of it – it is made with flour – ground grain, which increases the GI and unlike other breads, it is made without fat to give it that awesome texture. So then you eat it with Brie and you pretty much have the same product as regular bread made with fat.
    Yup, it’s a head scratcher! I really think it comes down to quantity eaten at one sitting. Try as we might to come up with substitutes for those goodies we love, we still need to limit those dense carb foods – even the high GI ones.
    Here’s a nice way to eat brie: http://www.bite.co.nz/recipe/8397/Chicken-salad-with-brie-and-toasted-almonds/
    Looks good hey?!

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    Reheating starches will definitely reduce the amount of resistant starch. The added water (soup) is my own hypothesis! Maybe Norm can chime in…
    Starches gel when cooked. When cooled, it is the crystallized ‘gel’ that forms resistant starch. So my thinking is that adding lots of water will help re-gelatinize the starch just like adding water to any crystallized product – sugar, salt etc.
    Another point to note, resistant starches are formed more at cold temps. ie. freezing. Frozen bread has higher RS than fresh bread.

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    I would look for the amount of amylose starch in the product. The more amylose, the more resistant starch. Jasmine rice contains approx. 15% amylose starch. Sticky rice contains approx. 1% amylose starch so would form less resistant starch when cold (yay for sushi!)
    Resistant starch also depends on moisture content. You will be getting much more resistant starch from potato flour vs. eating potato salad. If you use leftover starches, try to reheat them in liquid (ie. in a soup) for the least amount of resistant starch.

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    Andrea, it does sound like you’re on the right track. I’m sure the rice milk would be quite low in resistant starch due to the water. As for the flour, I would recommend ‘Sweet Rice Flour’ instead. It is made using Glutinous rice (sticky rice). Because flour is dry, resistant starch would be an issue. Jasmine rice contains approx. 15% amylose starch whereas Sticky Rice contains less than 1% amylose starch. It’s the amylose starch that’s the culprit in forming resistant starch.
    “The amylose content of starches is the major cause of resistant starch formation.”
    http://www1.lsbu.ac.uk/water/hysta.html
    (this is an interesting read!)

    Another tidbit from this article:
    “amylomaizes contain over 50% amylose whereas ‘waxy’ maize has almost none (~3%)”
    I bought some waxy maize (you’ll find it at bodybuilding places or health food stores) but haven’t used it yet (still too busy with renos!!). It will replace cornstarch and potato starch in recipes.

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    Thanks for the info on Klaire Labs JI – looks like a quality product.
    So interesting about those yeast strains Norm. I quickly looked up Saccharomyces boulardii and found it advised for Hashimoto’s.

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    That’s interesting Norm. Thanks for the info. I’m fascinated that the leonardite itself doesn’t ferment. I just assumed that it would. Makes Prescript Assist more appealing to me.
    I wonder if it’s the minerals in the humic and fulvic acids that support the bacterial stains? As I learn more about fermenting foods, I’m learning that these little creatures need minerals in order to grow and reproduce.

    JI, thanks for the link to the probiotics you’re taking. The Klaire Labs formulas look really good. This is the one I’m taking: http://www.customprobiotics.com/custom-probiotics-11-strain.htm
    It has made my bowel movements normal!

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    Thanks for the info Norm. That’s interesting. I’m fascinated that the leonardite itself doesn’t ferment. I just assumed that it would. Makes Prescript Assist more appealing to me.
    I wonder if it’s the minerals in the humic and fulvic acids that support the bacterial stains? As I learn more about fermenting foods, I’m learning that these little creatures need minerals in order to grow and reproduce.

    JI, thanks for the link to the probiotics you’re taking. The Klaire Labs formulas look really good. This is the one I’m taking: http://www.customprobiotics.com/custom-probiotics-11-strain.htm
    It has made my bowel movements normal!

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    Thanks for the info Norm. Good to know. I’m fascinated that the leonardite itself doesn’t ferment. I just assumed that it would. Makes Prescript Assist more appealing to me.
    I wonder if it’s the minerals in the humic and fulvic acids that support the bacterial stains? As I learn more about fermenting foods, I’m learning that these little creatures need minerals in order to grow and reproduce.

    JI, thanks for the link to the probiotics you’re taking. The Klaire Labs formulas look really good. This is the one I’m taking: http://www.customprobiotics.com/custom-probiotics-11-strain.htm
    It has made my bowel movements normal!

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    I think the higher molecular mass carbs are oligosaccharides.
    Too bad.

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    One day soon I’m going to try making a honey alternative out of dextrose. Honey, by law, should have only 18% moisture to prevent fermentation so that means a glucose syrup will need a concentration of 82% to be equivalent in moisture content. Problem is – glucose loves to crystallize so it will probably need to be made fresh each time you use it. Too bad.
    Take note that glucose syrups that you can buy aren’t actually made from glucose! “A typical glucose syrup contains 19% glucose, 14% maltose, 11% maltotriose and 56% higher molecular mass carbohydrates.”

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    I’m fascinated that the leonardite doesn’t ferment. I just assumed that it would. Makes Prescript Assist more appealing to me.
    I wonder if it’s the minerals in the humic and fulvic acids that support the bacterial strains? As I learn more about fermenting foods, I’m learning that these little creatures need minerals in order to grow and reproduce.

    JI, thanks for the link to the probiotics you’re taking. The Klaire Labs formulas look really good. This is the one I’m taking: http://www.customprobiotics.com/custom-probiotics-11-strain.htm
    It has made my bowel movements normal!

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    I’m fascinated that the leonardite doesn’t ferment. I just assumed that it would. Makes Prescript Assist more appealing to me.
    I wonder if it’s the minerals in the humic and fulvic acids that support the bacterial stains? As I learn more about fermenting foods, I’m learning that these little creatures need minerals in order to grow and reproduce.

    JI, thanks for the link to the probiotics you’re taking. The Klaire Labs formulas look really good. This is the one I’m taking: http://www.customprobiotics.com/custom-probiotics-11-strain.htm
    It has made my bowel movements normal!

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    Hmmm, my post didn’t seem to post. I’ll try it again…

    I’m fascinated that the leonardite doesn’t ferment. I just assumed that it would. Makes Prescript Assist more appealing to me.
    I wonder if it’s the minerals in the humic and fulvic acids that support the bacterial stains? As I learn more about fermenting foods, I’m learning that these little creatures need minerals in order to grow and reproduce.

    JI, thanks for the link to the probiotics you’re taking. The Klaire Labs formulas look really good. This is the one I’m taking: http://www.customprobiotics.com/custom-probiotics-11-strain.htm
    It has made my bowel movements normal!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 26 total)