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Why does SIBO return so quickly even with this diet?

//Why does SIBO return so quickly even with this diet?
Why does SIBO return so quickly even with this diet?2014-07-02T08:33:25+00:00

Fast Tract Diet for SIBO Forum Fast Tract Diet Q&A Why does SIBO return so quickly even with this diet?

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
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  • Zad
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Hi guys,
    I’ve been reading through the forums and I’ve noticed that a lot of people including Norm have said that even though they’ve been on the diet for a very long time if they go off the diet even for a little while SIBO symptoms return. If one were to be on the diet for a long time wouldn’t the bacteria in the small intestine that feed on carbohydrates die? How can the symptoms return so fast especially for someone like Norm who has been on the diet for so long?

    danb1
    Participant
    Post count: 18

    I’m no expert zad, but I’m starting to think that its down to motility. In that slow motility is a root cause/condition for SIBO (and other digestive problems, so I’ve read) as the bacteria are not pushed out of the small intestine effectively, thus causing overgrowth. I think the low FP approach helps this, but unless its addressed, the problem will return. I’d guess that applies to taking antibiotics as a solution also. My brother has also had digestive issues (not SIBO) different to me, but has discovered his problems are down to slow/poor motility, and I’m guessing mine are too. I’m starting to investigate other dietary ways of stimulating motility with a nutritionalist/herbalist and addressing stress/anxiety issues.

    Chris
    Participant
    Post count: 7

    Human cells make up about 10% of your body; the rest is bacteria, mostly in the gut. Getting completely rid of any kind of bad bacteria is unlikely. The numbers can go down until the symptoms are gone. However, if conditions become favorable again for the bad bacteria, they will multiply.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Hi Zad, One way to look at it might be a comparison to sugar and type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes don’t tolerate as many carbs as people without it. The same is true of people who are susceptible to SIBO. Like type 2 diabetes, it can get show up as we age. In paleolithic times, it likely was not much of a problem given the sporadic availability of sugars and starches. But in modern times, what we consider a reasonable if carb-loaded diet might be quite the opposite by paleolithic standards. On a positive note, I have actually become quite a bit more tolerant over the years. But you are correct. If I abuse that tolerance over a period of several days, symptoms do begin to reappear. But I don’t see that as a problem at all as the same type of excess also leads me to gain wait – a double whammy. I agree with the comments of Dan and Chis as well.

    hazymandolin
    Participant
    Post count: 22

    I concluded from reading Norm’s books and other research on SIBO that it is a case of controlling the bacterial numbers rather than eradicating them. If we could figure out why they are overgrowing then that would be a great help, but it is difficult (so many causes etc).

    The motility point is an interesting one as I seem to fair far better if I leave several hours between my meals (no snacking) – and I was wondering if this was down to motility i.e. by not eating I am giving my gut peristalsis a chance to do it’s job. It is something I am trying to work on (but I love my food and so love to snack). I would be interested if anyone knows of some good websites that talk about this (some evidence to back up the theory may go some way to pushing me into action)

    Kelly
    Participant
    Post count: 77

    I don’t know if this is related to motility, but I just finished reading about the hormones that control hunger & satiety. We need to get hungry before meals or the cycle of hormones gets out of whack and they don’t get to do all the things they’re supposed to do. (which I can’t remember now) I learned about this from The Paleo Approach by Sarah Ballantyne, which you may be able to get from your library if you can’t/don’t want to buy it.

    hazymandolin
    Participant
    Post count: 22

    Kelly, thanks for the book recommendation. I would love to learn about the hormonal side of it, and it’s interesting that she mentions the requirement to be hungry. I am trying really hard to only eat when I am hungry but it’s pretty tough!

    Kelly
    Participant
    Post count: 77

    She does recommend a gradual transition, so you don’t cause a lot of stress. For cravings, some people find that glutamine helps. Also, a tablespoon or two of fat can make you feel satisfied. Coconut oil is the usual recommendation because the type of fat digests quickly, but any fat works.

    For me, any form of sugar or grains cause intense cravings. You may want to try cutting them out temporarily and see if it makes a difference for you.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

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