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questions about foods not mentioned in book

//questions about foods not mentioned in book
questions about foods not mentioned in book2014-11-30T19:08:47+00:00

Fast Tract Diet for SIBO Forum Fast Tract Diet Q&A questions about foods not mentioned in book

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • sandcam95
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    Hi Norman,
    I wrote you a few days ago but I think I didn’t submit it properly, so sorry if this is a repeat.

    I read your book and now have a better understanding of what SIBO is and what causes it. But I’m not sure I understand your recommendations completely. Although you have blueberries, for example, listed as having moderate relative symptoms risk and an 11 for FP you list in in your recipes. Since the bacteria are so resistant and difficult to get rid of shouldn’t we be sticking to foods that have a low relative symptom risk? Plus does the the FP number you have mean the potential is higher the higher the number or if you consume that amount of grams then it corresponds to whether or not it is rated as low, medium or high risk? I want to make sure that the bacteria have absolutely nothing to feed on and am confused as to where the cut off is. I know for example that with eggs it has zero FP and low risk so that seems clear that they cannot get fuel from this food but that from blueberries they could?

    How do probiotics fit into the picture. I have read a lot of different information and some say no way should we take probiotics until the SIBO is gone and others say it is important to take them? You also make no mention of different herbs that in my eyes need to be taken to kill the bacteria such as berberine and others, any thoughts or suggestions.

    Lastly the following foods are not mentioned in your book and I would like to know what the FP and risk are for them:
    1. aloe vera
    2. Kambucha and femented foods like sauerkraut
    3. Spirulina
    4. Soaked flax seeds(I swallow them whole for constipation)
    5. Can using toothpaste with xylitol feed the bacteria?

    THank you and I look forward to your response to clear up my confusion.
    Stephanie

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Hi Sancam,
    Yes, blueberries are listed in the table (serving size 4.2 ounces) with an FP of 11 grams. But 1/2 cup of blueberries represents a 2.6 ounce serving size having an FP of only 7 grams. Also, many of the recipes only call for 1/3 cup making the FP value even lower. The FP grams of blueberries represent sugar and fiber and can absolutely feed gut bacteria. But moderate serving sizes should be well tolerated as long as overall FP is controlled.

    You are correct: The symptom potential is higher for higher FP values. As stated in the book, 7 grams FP or less in a single meal (all food in the meal combined) is considered low. Up to 15 grams (all foods in a meal) is considered moderate, etc. Reduce the total FP for a meal if needed by reducing serving size or choosing lower FP foods.
    Probiotics are discussed in the book. A general rule of thumb is that probiotics that don’t produce gas are the safest – L. acidophilus, B. bifida, etc.

    For determining FP for foods not listed you can look up the nutrition facts and use the FP tool on this site, or for a rough estimate, count up total carbs minus fiber, divide by two and add fiber grams to that subtotal.
    1. aloe vera – relatively low carb and should be fine.
    2. Kambucha (3 ounce serving has about 3 grams of FP) and femented foods like sauerkraut (1/2 cup, 71 grams is FP = 3 grams). For Kambucha, opt for lower carb / lower sugar brands or recipes.
    3. Spirulina: FP is about 4 grams for a one ounce serving.
    4. Soaked flax seeds(I swallow them whole for constipation). Flax seeds are mostly fiber – FP = 9 grams for a 1.1 ounce serving. Flax seeds are in the ebooks and second printings of the paperbacks.
    5. Can using toothpaste with xylitol feed the bacteria? Should be fine. Not much xylitol used and you only rinse with it.

    Perpetual Student
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Because of multiple food allergies and intolerances, if I try the Fast Tract Diet Plan I will have to avoid gluten, eggs, soy, corn and all dairy. It can be done, but is there any sweetener I can use with my limitations? NuStevia has additives I can’t have and erythritol is made from corn. I seem to be able to tolerate honey, but how much honey could be used without disrupting the plan? Is rilose a possibility? I am eager to get started, but know that to be emotionally successful longterm I will need some kind of sweetener in moderation.

    49barefoot
    Participant
    Post count: 35

    There are lots of different stevia formulations, some in alcohol and some in glycerine. I shop online from sellers that list all ingredients, so you may find something that works for you.

    Perpetual Student
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    When I first read the book concerning stevia, I thought it said that most stevia products contained sugar alcohols and would not be OK. Then I re-read it and it does say there are some without. But when I look at the two brands I have on hand and others I have tried in the past, none of them have sugar alcohols. Sweet Leaf Organic Stevia Extract, for instance, is a simple powder that doesn’t have anything else in it if I can trust the label. I’m confused. Is that stevia OK? Sweet Leaf stevia liquid says Purified water, Stevia Extract and Natural Flavors. I just need some clarification.

    49barefoot
    Participant
    Post count: 35

    It doesn’t have any fermentable carbs, but that doesn’t mean you can safely consume a lot. Use it in 1 or 2 drinks a day, and otherwise aim to wean yourself from needing sweetness.

    Kelly
    Participant
    Post count: 77

    You could try glucose as a sweetener. IIRC it counts as 0 FP if used in moderation.

    Perpetual Student
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Thanks for all the replies.

    I believe all glucose you can buy these days is made out of corn or sometimes wheat. The same goes for erythritol. That just leaves stevia, unless you count splenda which I choose not to use.

    Does anyone know how much total honey per day would be acceptable on this diet plan? Honey would be the easiest for me to use. Are we talking about a tablespoon? Less? I don’t necessarily need sweet drinks. I just want to be able to have a small legal “dessert” of some kind now and then.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Honey is actually not too bad in small amounts. 1 teaspoon weights 7 grams and has 3 grams of FP. The same goes for sucrose, brown sugar, and maple syrup – 1 teaspoon has an FP of 2 grams. The problem comes when you have too much through out the day, the FPs add up.

    Perpetual Student
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Thank you so much for your answer! Concise, to the point and useful. Appreciate it.

    CantEatFood
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    Hi there,

    I have SIBO (inactive), diagnosed using a breath test. I’ve had to eliminate gluten, dairy, eggs (i get hives and diarrhea/nausea), soy/legumes, and grapes (in wine/beverages or fresh–they make me nauseous, don’t know why).

    I was told to avoid foods that are high in soluble fiber because they would feed the bacteria, leading to more overgrowth. Thus, my diet is very restricted. I’ve been trying a modified FODMAPS, and I’ve bought your book because I’m interested in the fermentation theory.

    What I don’t see in the charts that are staple foods for me:

    Rice milk (Rice Dream, regular)
    Arrowhead Mills puffed rice cereal
    almond butter (any brand with No salt, no oil, and No sugar) – almonds are mentioned and almond flour, but not almond butter.
    Cornstarch – I can’t seem to tolerate corn pasta or polenta, but cornstarch in small amounts is different, isn’t it?
    Ginger–though i see this in your recipes, i wondered about this option: the only “dessert” i allow myself is a handful of Gin-Gins–these are small chewy candies the size of a jolly rancher, made of ginger, cornstarch, and sugar, 20 Calories each.

    Also, i wondered what to do when there’s no way of knowing which kind of rice a food item is made from — as with many kinds of rice crackers (say, Lundgren’s rice cakes or Edward & Sons brown rice snaps)?

    Thank you! I have a separate question about soluble fiber and SIBO, which I’ll post in the forum about your suggested diet.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Hi CantEat, The list of foods continues to grow. Thanks for posting. I take these suggestions and add them to my list. I update the tables when new e-book or printings come out and for a mobile app we are working on. Let me take a stab at these:
    Rice milk (Rice Dream, regular): 1 cup, FP = 3 grams
    Arrowhead Mills puffed rice cereal: 1 cup, FP = 2 grams.
    almond butter (any brand with No salt, no oil, and No sugar) – almonds are mentioned and almond flour, but not almond butter. Assume the FP is the same as peanut butter. FP = 5 grams per 2 tablespoons.
    Cornstarch – I can’t seem to tolerate corn pasta or polenta, but cornstarch in small amounts is different, isn’t it? one tablespoon has an FP = 1 gram.
    Ginger–though i see this in your recipes, i wondered about this option: the only “dessert” i allow myself is a handful of Gin-Gins–these are small chewy candies the size of a jolly rancher, made of ginger, cornstarch, and sugar, 20 Calories each. For these candies, count the carbs you consume and divide by two. That’s a conservative approximation of the FP.

    CantEatFood
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    Dr. Robillard,

    Thank you for this info–very helpful!

    I wondered if you could comment on Sprouted rice vs Regular rice? They’re now making sprouted rice milk, and some stores have stopped carrying plain old rice milk. I’m hesitant to try it–will it be okay for a SIBO diet?

    Thanks!

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Hi CantEat,
    I don’t know much about sprouted rice. Most sprouted rice links I found refer to sprouted short grain brown rice. I can’t find a glycemic index value. In these cases, I would play it safe and use a conservative GI of 60 (even though it might be higher given it’s short grain).

    According to these nutritional facts: http://www.lundberg.com/product/organic-sprouted-short-grain-brown-rice/, 1/4 cup dry rice has 33 grams total carbs and 3 grams of fiber. Using the FP calculator (https://digestivehealthinstitute.org/fp-calculator/) I get an FP of 15 grams.

    For the unsprouted rice milk (http://www.tastethedream.com/products/product/1467/202.php), there are 23 grams total carbs and no fiber per cup for an FP of 11 grams.

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