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  • budgiemom
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    Post count: 17

    I have seen such mixed information about taking probiotics with SIBO. Some sources say it’s a BIG no, while others say some varieties are ok, as long as they don’t have FOS or other prebiotics. Norm, what are your thoughts on probiotics?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Some probiotics can lead to bloating – if they are gas producing. Less gas producing probiotics include bifidobacteria and lactobacillus. I am currently investigating the soil-based Prescript-Assist probiotics and will do a post on these in the coming months.

    In general, they don’t seem to do much harm, but also haven’t had a magic bullet effect either. The challenge likely has to do with the fact that our gut microbiome is so vast, diverse and complex. Expecting miracles from current probiotics may be unreasonable.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Hi Norm- Mark Sisson’s new probiotic blend is supposed to be soil based. I think the best advice is what you gave regarding delayed-release/enteric-coated so the probiotics make it to the small intestine. Sisson’s blend is supposed to contain strains that survive best to the small intestine. Oddly, I seem to find kefir a benefit, but wonder how its bacteria survive the stomach?

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348
    JI
    Participant
    Post count: 180

    I have been taking probiotics off and on, confused by whether or not they are beneficial. I had a very active case of SIBO 8 months ago. I had a follow up hydrogen breath test today, and the SIBO is gone. I attribute it to my round of antibiotic therapy followed by the Fast Tract diet and getting off the Nexium. At the time of my diagnosis, I was told to take Align, and I did for a while. I don’t think it promotes SIBO. I recently asked a doctor that I really respect about probiotics, and she said she preferred that I get them through food sources. My husband then chimed in, saying his homemade yogurt would be good for me. I may also try making homemade kefir.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    The key is getting the probiotics to survive the stomach and make it into the intestines. Thanks to Norm, I now look for delayed-release/enteric-coated or strains guaranteed to survive the stomach. Not many brands out there qualify. I drink kefir and eat yogurt & lacto-fermented kimchi/veggies, but wonder if the probiotics in food survive the stomach?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Some of the bacteria in yogurt, kefir, etc. will survive and reach the gut, but far fewer compared to encapsulated or enteric coated formulations. Even SBOs will be killed in high numbers because only some of the species are spore-formers and even those may be mostly in a vegetative state (susceptible to stomach acid) unless they were induced to form spores during the production process.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Sorry I don’t recognize SBOs?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Sorry, Soil-based-organisms.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Hi Norm – in regards to probiotics, which bacteria are supposed to be in the small intestine? Which ones are not?

    Which ones are doing all of the bad fermenting in the small intestine? (don’t want a probiotic with those in it)

    One company states that its probiotic coating survives the small intestine too, and delivers all of the bacteria to the large intestine. Others have a gel matrix that slowly releases the bacteria as it moves along the digestive tract, some have a gelatin capsule that dissolves after stomach and dumps the bacteria all at once.

    Do digestive enzymes dissolve these capsules/tablets/pearls too quickly?

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