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Plain yoghurt2014-12-03T13:04:51+00:00
Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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  • sivert
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    Post count: 12

    I’m a bit confused over the GI of plain yoghurt – the book states that it is 36, but that’s almost the same as the GI of sugar-sweetened fruit yoghurt, and that makes little sense.

    The values I find online are as low as 14 reported here: http://www.livestrong.com/article/332042-what-is-the-glycemic-index-of-plain-yogurt/ among others.

    I’m assuming that the fat content is of no importance for the calculation

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    livestrong.com does not provide any references. It’s sad to see so many website pulling GI values from i-don’t-want-to-know-where!
    If you look at the usual scientific sources you’ll see that yoghurt has been tested extensively, however, not natural, unsweetened, full-fat/whole yoghurt. Whereas, full-fat/whole milk has been tested a lot. IIRC, Norm uses a GI of 30 in his book (don’t have it at hand right now) which is a “conservative” value since several tests show even higher values. Now, yoghurt is generally easier on the stomach/intestines than plain milk (as explained in the FTD book). So, a higher GI seems to be justified. And some tests confirm this.
    Sweetened yoghurt should have a higher GI simply because in general it is sweetened with table sugar which has a GI of 65%. If you look at the GI tests data, many show GIs greater than 36. There are also some with lower values. But without knowing the exact ingredients it’s rather pointless to speculate.
    Fortunately, the GI of unsweetened yoghurt is less of an issue since full-fat yoghurt has only 5% or less carbs.

    sivert
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    As I already wrote, the book’s value is 36. So my question is, if this can really be, since similar values are found for sugar-sweetened yoghurt.

    And I’m not sure what is meant by “usual scientific sources”. Do you have a real reference?

    My question regards plain yogurt, so no ingredients to speculate about.

    ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210

    Sivert I think there are two additional issues with yogurt. One is that the microbes used to make yogurt digest the lactose, so even though there is measureable milk sugar (lactose) listed in the product, it is mostly pre-digested, thereby lowering the FP considerably. Additionally I find greek yogurt to be more satisfying and well tollerated than other plain yogurt recipes, because it has been strained, further reducing the whey content.

    https://www.insidetracker.com/blog/post/36206544640/diet-digest-regular-yogurt-vs-greek-yogurt

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    I have compiled a list of scientific sources for GI data at http://andreas.schamanek.net/dw/public:fasttractdiet

    ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210

    Awesome Andrea! THANKS!

    ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210

    Andrea, in the sweetener index it lists Splenda with a GI of 80, and sucralose with a GI of 0? I thought they were the same?

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    As I indicated, I do not trust such simplified indexes much. However, Glycemic Index for Sweeteners is a handy overview, and so far the values withstood my checks.
    About Splenda: It is based on sucralose, it is not just sucralose. I don’t know much about Splenda, though. Maybe different kinds of Splenda are sold?
    See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sucralose and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Splenda

    sivert
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    Thanks for the link collection Andreas, great resource!

    I don’t eat sweetened yoghurt at all, but I just found it strange that the GI of sweetened and unsweetened yoghurt are so similar. I can see that if the lactose is indeed broken down into galactose and glucose in the final product (despite being listed as lactose) this would make the GI higher. I often use foodcomp.dk and it lists yoghurt (here http://www.foodcomp.dk/v7/fvdb_details.asp?FoodId=0333) as having 2.5 g lactose and 3.8 g total carbohydrate. No glucose listed, though, so that doesn’t really fit with your assumption…

    For me, it’s dangerous to speculate that the FP is lower than what a strict analysis and calculation tells you, because I’m not ever well enough that I can easily tell if I tolerate individual foods or not (I can only slowly guess what my major triggers are)

    patience
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    Sivert, that is a problem for me too. I cannot tell what foods are my triggers because I almost always have at least a mild symptom happening.

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