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  • JI
    Participant
    Post count: 180

    Hello everyone. A while back an ND tested my saliva and found that it was highly alkaline. This was in the afternoon, after eating a couple of meals and drinking lots of water. I bought some PH test strips and tested my saliva this morning before eating or drinking anything. My results showed that my saliva is acidic. I am wondering if these test strips are accurate and if they can predict the acidity/alkalinity of the stomach as I have GERD. Is the testing of the saliva a way to determine this? Does eating more alkaline foods help balance over acidity? I have noticed quite a bit of an acidic taste in my mouth lately. Norm, this is probably a question for you, but anyone else with knowledge of this subject is welcome to chime in.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Saliva should be close to neutral pH, about 6.5 to 7. It’s possible that it could become acidic due to reflux/regurgitation, but I would expect it to correct it self pretty quick. The body regulates pH pretty tightly. I am not sure what else you could learn about your stomach acid levels by this test.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Hi Norm,

    Supposedly the saliva pH has nothing to do with stomach acid (unless there is reflux residue in the mouth when taking the test – it is advised to work up saliva, swallow it, and repeat two times to cleanse the mouth before taking the pH test).

    What is your opinion of the theory of certain foods making the body pH (not stomach acid) more acid or alkaline? One camp believes that foods, whether testing acid or alkaline before eating, are metabolized in the body in a way that the end result is acid or alkaline body chemistry. Is there any evidence of this?

    I have noticed that while on the low-acid/no-fat diet I had developed a very weird, bad taste in my mouth (not acid, almost a putrifying taste). Is this due to the rapid weight loss creating a ketosis or other metabolic condition?

    Thank you for your generosity of time in answering all of our questions on this forum. 🙂

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Jaeme,
    Most of the literature I have read on pH has to do with blood pH which is tightly and actively regulated. I have seen no convincing data suggesting that diet impacts blood pH. It could exist, but I haven’t seen it.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Thanks Norm!

    I have started the FT diet, but since I am transitioning from the low-acid/no fat diet, I am going easy on the acidic foods until the reflux gets under control with the FT diet (since LPR is supposedly caused by pepsin reflux in the throat being activated by acid).

    Had my first cup of coffee today – woohoo! Did go with the decaf in case the caffeine is weakening the LES (what is your opinion of that theory?). Our area stores do not carry light cream, so I used heavy cream, just less of it. Sweetened with the Dextrose/Stevia – not bad! 🙂

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Sure. It’s up to you Jaeme. It can be challenging to combine two different types of diet, but whatever works for you. I don’t think coffee / caffeine is a problem if FP is low.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Actually Norm, your diet is easy to transition to. I am able to do all of the recipes- for now just keeping acid foods to a minimum until throat heals up a bit. I am a “math-a-phobe”, though, so figuring out the FPs of new foods is challenging. Is there an app for that, ha ha? 🙂

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Working on it (app). At least its on the list!

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