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Mineral contributing to reflux

//Mineral contributing to reflux
Mineral contributing to reflux2014-11-13T13:47:16+00:00

Fast Tract Diet for SIBO Forum Heartburn and GERD Mineral contributing to reflux

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • 49barefoot
    Participant
    Post count: 35

    I just had an endoscopy, and everything looks fine. The G.I. doctor suggested I stop taking ALL supplements, as maybe they are creating the problem. These include chelated magnesium, potassium gluconate, co-q10, mk 7, all for cardiovascular health. Any knowledgeable opinions on this?

    ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210

    Hi
    I am new to the diet and just started it myself. I use magnesium oxide myself. It is not absorbed but draws water into the intestine. Right now I HAVE to have magnesium to move my bowels as my body adjusts to this diet.

    Are you already following the Fast Track Diet? If so, and you are not getting the results you want, I think there is no harm in taking out all the supplements and then adding them back one at a time, after you get to a better baseline? If you are not using the FTD yet, then maybe start there?

    In my 2+ years of health reasearch for my own health issues, I have come to realize, that if the gut is working well and you are absorbing nutrients, then staying active (and sitting less!!), drinking water, moderating alchohol and sugar consumption, eating the whole foods outlined here, and managing stress are going to go the furthest in protecting your heart 🙂

    49barefoot
    Participant
    Post count: 35

    Thanks for the response. I’ve been sort of on the diet for about 3 weeks. That means days where I’m on it, but had family in town for a wedding and lots of leftover food from the wedding, so I’m just now getting to be strict about the diet. I am following the GAPS diet suggestion of lots of bone broth.

    ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210

    Great! My advice would be to follow the diet strictly for 2 weeks to see if you can get the basline you want and then trouble shoot from there. I have a supplement in my protocol that is questionable (contains some oat and rice fiber in small amounts). I decided to take it out just so it is not nagging at me that it might be causing symptoms. IT seems that with your supplements, there is the possibility of gastric distress, especially since you have a history of GI complaints. Per the GI doc, I think it prudent to take them out and see where you are with the diet alone.

    49barefoot
    Participant
    Post count: 35

    Actually, I don’t trust this G.I. doctor. He claimed there is no need to ever test for stomach acid levels, just prescribes ppi’s and H-2 blockers, and never heard of sibo. He also doesn’t know of the heart conditions I’ve kept under control with supplements. I’m hoping someone on this site understands the biochemistry of the supplements in the stomach to provide some science-based answers.

    ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210

    Does not sound like that doctor is a good fit for you!!

    I understand your concerns about your heart. I suffer from Interstitial Cysitis, which has MANY co-morbidities, including heart issues. When my holistic doctor treats IC, which is, essentiallly healing the gut, she sees the heart issues improve dramatically. My heart issues are a fluttery/racing feeling in my heart, as though it is skipping a beat. It has gotten a lot better as I heal my gut. I have come to see how much gut health influences ALL heatlh.

    I was not suggesting that you go off your supplements long term. Only that if you are not getting results after strict adherence to the diet for several weeks or more, that it would be something to consider removing them on a short term basis.

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    More often than not, it is the fillers in the supplements that cause issues. There are a few companies that address this. Here are a couple:
    1) Pure Encapsulations – expensive though…
    http://www.pureencapsulations.com/
    2) Dr. Ron’s
    http://www.drrons.com/

    I take Ubiquinol rather than CoQ10. Mercola has a good one with no additives:
    http://products.mercola.com/coq10-ubiquinol/
    Other Ingredients: Medium chain triglycerides, Citrus extract, Capsule (Tilapia Fish Gelatin,Water).

    If you’re taking supplements for cardiovascular health – I have found something that is amazing! I originally was researching for my teeth – and found vitamin K2. The cardiovascular studies on this vitamin are truly impressive. There are 2 forms – MK4 and MK7. Almost everything you find is MK7 but MK4 seems to be better. I buy the Thorne drops and take 2 drops per day. Don’t go by the directions – they advise far too much. 2 drops is plenty. The bottle will last a loooong time. http://www.iherb.com/thorne-research-vitamin-k2-1-fl-oz-30-ml/21592

    Here’s some info on it:
    “Vitamin K2 is a little known but extremely important fat-soluble vitamin. Some coin this nutrient ‘the missing link’.
    In a nutshell, vitamin K2 plays an important role in mineral absorption and metabolism. It helps to move calcium into the proper areas in your body, such as your bones and teeth. It also plays a role in removing calcium from areas where it shouldn’t be, such as in your arteries and soft tissues. K2 is really critical for keeping your bones strong and your arteries clear. Its other main role is to activate proteins that control cell growth. That means K2 has a very important role to play in cancer protection,

    A recent study examined the relationship between K2 (in the form of MK-4 through 10) consumption and heart attack risk in 4,600 Dutch men. They found a strong inverse association between K2 consumption and heart attack mortality risk. Men with the highest K2 consumption had a whopping 51% lower risk of heart attack mortality and a 26% lower risk of death from all causes compared to men eating the least K2.
    Perigord, France is the world’s capital of foie gras, or fatty goose liver. Foie gras turns out to be the richest known source of K2. Perigord also has the lowest rate of cardiovascular mortality in France, a country already noted for its low CVD mortality.
    Rats fed warfarin, a drug that inhibits K2 recycling, develop arterial calcification. Feeding the rats K2 completely inhibits this effect. Mice lacking matrix Gla protein (MGP), a vitamin K-dependent protein that guards against arterial calcification, develop heavily calcified aortas and die prematurely. The link between K2 and cardiovascular disease is a very strong one.

    Vitamin K2, MK-4 is only found in animal products. The best sources known are grass-fed butter from cows eating rapidly growing grass, and foie gras.”

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    Silly me – I just noticed that you listed MK7 as a supplement you’re taking!
    So you know all about vitamin K2…
    I’ll leave the info for others. 🙂

    49barefoot
    Participant
    Post count: 35

    I used to get my K2 from natto, before it was available as a supplement! However, I hadn’t heard about the mk4. Since I eat the right butter, I’m probably getting that as well.
    Thanks for info re: fillers, Lana!

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