Fast Tract Diet for SIBO Forum Laryngopharyngeal Reflux – LPR LPR, Rosacea, Low Acid Diet link?

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  • Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    After being diagnosed with LPR, I was put on the extreme “Induction Diet”: almost no fat, low acid, high carb, high protein, and some vegetables. I have had rosacea for years, but was completely under control until this new diet and now the rosacea is all coming back despite being on topical medication.

    You mention there may be a connection with SIBO and rosacea, and LPR? My resurgence of rosacea on this high-carb diet sounds like good evidence?

    Prior to this, I always ate a whole foods, no processed food or beverage, high Omega 3 with our own raised grass-fed meat, diet. My blood work, weight, blood pressure, and all other readings were stellar – doctor always asked what my secret was. The only risk-factor for LPR is stress, and now maybe I think the whole-grain carbs?

    How successful have followers with LPR been on your diet?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    I have had good success working with people with LPR. This one of the most frequent problems people approach me about. Hopefully, some LPR folks will post a replay. Since LPR is reflux-related, the Fast Tract Diet is a sensible approach. The one thing I notice with LPR is that it takes longer than simple heartburn to respond to the diet. It may have to do with the sensitive nature of the vocal cords or something else, but it does take up to a month or more for results.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Thank you for your quick responses Norm! Your site is giving me hope. 🙂

    The larynx/pharynx area has no protection against acid like the esophagus and stomach, so the area is way more sensitive to acid/pepsin and once irritated, takes much longer to heal and desensitize. Hence the main symptoms of LPR – heavy post-nasal drip, heavy throat mucus, feeling lump in throat, coughing/choking, etc. – the body’s only way of trying to protect the area from the acid. So I am not surprised that it takes a month with the FTD to see improvement, especially since it takes a little while to starve off those carb bacteria.

    I will certainly let you know how I do with the FDT, as the low-acid/no-fat approach is not working for me. Hoping to see the rosacea go back to remission as well. Very interesting connection – your site is the first time I had read about it, but I certainly am experiencing it.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Your statement ” the body’s only way of trying to protect the area from the acid.” makes sense to me. Just one point about the diet. Fast Tract Diet in no way “starves” the bacteria. Sometimes (I may be guilty too) the term “starve the bacteria” is thrown around loosely as in “removing carbs fueling SIBO”, but the diet includes 30-40 grams of fermentable carbs. Also, gut bacteria feed on proteins (10-20% malabsorbed) as well as mucus and other enzymes / proteins that the body makes. Feeding via mucus (which is mostly carbohydrate) is likely one way the body feeds the the well adapted bacteria – a partnership. If we were “starving” our gut bacteria, we would hardly form any poop. It’s just not the case. How would wolves have a gut microbiota if gut microbes were dependent on high amounts of carbohydrates?

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Thank you for clarifying, and thorough explanation. If the gut bacteria feed on mucus, they should be quite happy in someone with LPR, ha ha.

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