Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 50 total)
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  • Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Thanks for such a concise explanation!

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    JI – can any doctor order this test, or do you need to see a gastroenterologtist?

    JI
    Participant
    Post count: 180

    Jaeme, it was a Gastroenterologist who ordered the test. You can ask another doctor; but in my experience, they referred me to the specialist.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    I suppose Norm should move the last page and half of this thread to another thread, as we have gotten a little off track – but really good info, thanks everyone!

    Is there a test for Gluten intolerance, or is eliminating and reintroducing the only way to figure it out?

    JI
    Participant
    Post count: 180

    I think we have gotten off topic since the thread is Low FP Recipes! 🙂 I don’t know of a test for gluten intolerance; I believe you must eliminate and reintroduce.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    I don’t believe there is any “validated” test for non celiac gluten intolerance. If you know you don’t have celiac disease (excellent tests available), the best course of action is likely a gluten elimination diet while monitoring symptoms.

    *Just learning the ropes of forum admin. It might be best to just start a new thread. Low FP Recipes 2.

    mchurch314
    Participant
    Post count: 61

    Morning guys…I just had a test for Gluten intolerance. I don’t know the specifics of the test other than they took blood and sent it to a lab. My test came back negative. I asked the Doc if it was 100% accurate and he said that it wasn’t. He said there were more extensive test but, as Norm stated, the best and cheapest way to make this determination was to eliminate it from your diet for awhile and see what happens.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    That’s good news. But you might go ahead and eliminate gluten for a while just the same and see what happens.

    JI
    Participant
    Post count: 180

    I had a blood panel done for food allergies which indicated that my strongest reaction to any grains was in the “very low” category. But, I largely avoid them because of the tendency to have high carbs and FP. Norm, I believe you told me that following the results of these tests would at most lead to a 10% improvement in symptoms. I’ll stick with a low FP diet.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    True enough for general food allergies. I would put gluten in a special category as gluten-mediated reactions can really have a powerful effect on the digestive process.

    mchurch314
    Participant
    Post count: 61

    Hey Norm, I realize that the FP diet prefers white bread, for example, over whole wheat due to whole wheats tendency to stay in the gut longer therefore promoting fermentation but some fiber is needed to “push things through the digestive track” so wouldn’t it be a reasonable trade off to allow some fiber in my diet and cut FP’s elsewhere? And how much fiber would be be considered ideal to get the benefits recommended by your typical nutritionist and still allow you to stay within the guidelines of the FP diet?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    For most people high fiber diets do more harm than good. You can always experiment after you get your symptoms under control with Fast Tract. Fiber from green leafy veggies seem like the best bet initially. There are a few claims that raw unmodified potato starch might be helpful, but some people get GI symptoms from it. Experiment with caution.

    mchurch314
    Participant
    Post count: 61

    I’ll heed your advise Norm. Funny thing is that, thinking that I was doing the right thing, I would always seek out the highest fiber items because that’s what conventional medicine and nutritionist promote as healthy. It’s been a crazy ride and I have had to completely change many of my beliefs about what is a healthy food. It’s to bad that there are so many, completely conflicting, opinions on things. It makes it very hard for the consumer.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Hi MC – How are you doing now? I switched over to “Fast Tract Users Updates”, and posted there. Hope to see you on that thread! 🙂

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    I hear you MC, It has been a crazy ride. I like to have fun with it though. It gives me something to debunk. The big problem is most of the dietary recommendations come from observational studies with by definition can’t prove anything (with smoking and cancer one possible exception because the association was so strong). They can only be used to generate hypotheses. But actually testing these hypotheses is expensive and time consuming, so here we are. The government(s) are setting nutritional guidelines based on the results of observational studies. Gary Taubes wrote a piece in the New York times a while back on this that was great reading. Here’s a link: http://nyti.ms/1kjsOwN

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 50 total)

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