Fast Tract Diet for SIBO Forum Fast Tract Recipes Low FP Ingredients

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  • Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    NR Posting for Lana:
    I’ve been taking a look at corn starch as I have been getting conflicting results about the Glycemic Index of it. Some are very high, others medium. While nosing around I came across something called Waxy Maize. It’s a high amylopectin corn starch. Cool!
    Bodybuilders use it for a high carb boost after a workout so it will be found in those circles. I’ve purchased from Pure Bulk before and the price looks good. Here is the link and the blurb:
    http://purebulk.com/waxy-maize-starch.html
    “Waxy maize starch is a corn starch that is high in complex carbohydrates. Domesticated maize contains two important types of starch polymers, amylose and amylopectin. Waxy maize is unique for containing high amounts of amylopectin, a branched, high molecular weight starch polymer consisting of molecules of glucose. Additionally, waxy maize is low in amylose starch molecules which are not digested easily in by the human body.”
    Unfortunately, I’ve also been getting conflicting info about this product. This site suggests the glycemic index is in the 60’s: http://www.caseperformance.com/22/the-great-waxy-maize-starch-myth
    But this paper shows that rats fed high amylopectin corn starch developed insulin resistance indicating that it is indeed high GI:
    http://jn.nutrition.org/content/125/6/1430.full.pdf
    Thoughts?!

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    Thanks for posting for me Norm! Hopefully everything will work for me next time. Have you heard of waxy maize? What do you think of my hypothesis that it must be high GI if the rats developed insulin resistance?
    What I’ve read is that it is 90% amylopectin. Is that considered very high? Seems to me amylopectin is the dominant starch in grains so don’t know if 90% would be considered high??

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    In general, I think you’re right. 90 % amylopectin assumes 10% amylose which should have a higher GI (perhaps 85-90?) than lower GI corn starches and flours with more typical ratio of 75% amylopectin / 25% amylose. As for the rats developing insulin-resistance, I wouldn’t read too much into it without knowing more about the type or rats (were they using a diabetic mouse model, etc.) and how much starch was fed to them. High blood sugar is driven by a combination of the GI and the total amount given.

    Lana
    Participant
    Post count: 31

    I finally found some solid information about waxy maize!

    The company that makes the Elaine Amylopectin Potato Starch has some literature comparing their potato starch to waxy maize. Elaine potato starch has less than 1% Amylose starch and Waxy Maize has less than 4% Amylose starch.
    http://www.agfdt.de/loads/st06/semeiabb.pdf

    I was trying to order some of the Elaine potato starch Norm and I see that there are several types. Did you get a breakdown about their differences? I know you sent me a paper with the info about it but it didn’t make much sense to me so I didn’t keep it. 🙁

    Actually, I don’t know if I can order small quantities. They most likely sell it by the truckload. I’ll probably have to stick with waxy maize for now – but less than 4% isn’t too bad right?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Thanks for the pdf. Very interesting info in the Eliane. I received the Eliane 100 that appears to be the most pure amylopectin starch available. As I recall, there was a pretty basic info sheet that came with it. If I find it I will post it. I contacted their US rep asking for some for recipe development. They are pretty generous likely hoping you will come up with some food ideas and buy larger quantities later. They sent about 3 pounds or so.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Does anyone know the GI or other info regarding Arrowroot (used as a thickener like corn or potato starch)?

    JI
    Participant
    Post count: 180

    Hi Jaeme– a couple of internet sources said that the GI for “arrowroot starch” is 85.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Miso question – there are many types of Miso, which is recommended for the FT recipes?

    I immediately eliminated any made with barley or brown rice. The white miso (shiro) is from soybeans & white rice and then a dark miso (hacho) that says just soybeans, but when looking at the ingredients it includes roasted barley.

    Per tablespoon carbs for Shiro = 6g, sugars = 4g. Carbs for Hacho = 4g, sugars = 0

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    I typically choose the miso with the lowest carb counts Jaeme, but very good point about barley in dark miso for people who are gluten intolerant. I hadn’t noticed that before. Thanks!

    elle
    Participant
    Post count: 10

    ok so I know I saw a post around here somewhere on Chia seeds FP equal to their fiber? What is their FP anyone?

    Also do I need to purchase another kindle copy of the FT diet for heartburn to have access to the new FP tables or will it update my kindle copy?
    Thanks! Elle

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    It should update as I did not upload it as a second edition. Yes, on Chia seeds. The FP equals the fiber as listed on the package.

    elle
    Participant
    Post count: 10

    Thanks Norm for all of your support to all of us! Really it was like feeling around in the dark until I found your humble site! I know once this model becomes the standard it will be hard to get this type of direct support so I cherish it while its here! Thank you!

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Thanks Elle. We’re all in this together.

    heatherj
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    Hi Norm,

    I have a couple of questions about ingredients.

    1) You list maple syrup as low in FP, so I assume its safe. But then you also list honey as low FP, and I thought that it wasn’t safe. All your recipes seem to use either dextrose – which I am wary of, because I have a gluten/grain sensitivity, or Splenda, which I have never been fond of – flavor-wise or chemical-wise. So could I use maple syrup (low FODMAP friendly, which is why I like it) as a safe substitute, in small amounts, in some of your recipes?

    2) Also, I’m a little confused on the status of coconut milk. I have a dairy intolerance, and so I drink coconut milk in my morning coffee, and sometimes use it in recipes in place of dairy. I use the canned version (not the refrigerated carton version). Is it safe?

    Thanks so much for your help. I’m excited to try out the diet. After a gluten- dairy- soy- free diet, then paleo, then FODMAPs, has only gotten me so far, I think this might be the missing piece!

    Heather

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Hi Heather,
    You’re right in concluding that a little maple syrup is not problem. A teaspoon is about 5 grams with an FP of approximately 2 grams. The only problem is just having one teaspoon – it’s delicious. Also if you happen to be a fructose malabsorber, the effective FP will likely be a bit higher. Theoretically, GI determinations are done in healthy people, though some subjects are likely fructose malabsorbers since they don’t routinely screen for it and it’s quite common.

    Unsweetened coconut milk has an FP = 0 grams.

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