Fast Tract Diet for SIBO Forum Heartburn and GERD LES, foods & strenghthening exercise

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  • Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Norm – do you agree with all of the foods that are suppose to weaken the LES, such as chocolate, mint, etc.?

    Has anyone tried the exercise to strengthen the LES? You are supposed to take a deep breath into the abdomen and hold it, while contracting and uncontracting the abdomen about 5-8 times, then let the breath out. Repeat for 5-10 reps (more as you build up the muscles).

    JI
    Participant
    Post count: 180

    Hello Jaeme,
    I find that walking helps me. Diaphragmatic breathing, bellows breathing, and kapalbhati are all supposed to be beneficial. There was an article about all of these types of yoga breathing on Livestrong Nov. 19, 2010, but I cannot find the article now. I’m sure you can find the breathing methods on the internet. I have not done the breathing exercises frequently enough to know if they are beneficial. They do relax me, and over time, strengthen the abdominal muscles.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    HI JI,

    Thank you for the suggestions – anything that is relaxing is bound to help just by reducing stress!

    I just started the exercise I mentioned above – I will let you know if it helps. I had forgotten about bellows breathing, and have not heard of kapalbhati – will search for that online. I used to do yoga, but have been away from it due to work & life issues (that caused the stress that probably caused the LPR). I am wondering now if yoga is an option, since it is recommended not to bend over for 2-3 hours after eating. I may write to Yoga Magazine and suggest a “Yoga Exercises for LPR/GERD” article. 🙂

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Here is a link to an article about an Austrian study that showed breathing exercises helped GERD. I am not surprised that follow-up studies or more info has not been released since, as anything that would reduce the use of PPIs/meds would get swept under the rug:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/12/16/breathing-heartburn-mild-exercises_n_1152156.html

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Interesting idea. Thanks for posting Jaeme. I haven’t give this much thought. But if it can help, great!

    mchurch314
    Participant
    Post count: 61

    I used to do Yoga regularly but due to my GERD, Im really restricted in what postures that I can comfortably perform. I no longer do any inverted positions and keep my prone positions to a minimum. I do Savansina (Corpse pose) by sitting in a reclining chair instead of laying on my back. I have creating a gentle yoga series that fits within these restrictions.

    – Standing stretch (hands to sky with flat palms)
    – Chair position (feet together and simulate sitting in chair)
    – Standing side bend (bending at side, sweep opposing arms over head)
    – Knee reach (bending at side, slide and down side of leg and try to touch side of knee).
    – Standing twist (hands on hips and then alternate between turning left and right)
    – Balanced leg raises (feet together, slide foot up to opposing knee and hold, straighten leg and stretch directly behind and hold then in front and hold)
    – Proud Warrior (look up on internet but do not do the floor portion)

    You’re really restricted without being about to do the floor postures but it’s better to make adjustments than to give it up all together. There is a young lady on Youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQew7AiwPWw) that was just diagnosed with GERD and she has yoga video for us GERDie’s. Check it out.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Awesome! Thanks MC! 🙂

    JI
    Participant
    Post count: 180

    Yes, thanks MC! I did a yoga routine regularly before I was diagnosed with GERD. I miss it A LOT!

    Pompadur
    Participant
    Post count: 39

    Hello! Thank you very much for the information about LES excersises.
    Have anyone some youtube link to apropriate breath technik, described in the first post?

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Apologies Pompadur – no videos available. The exercise in the first post was just a description posted on another forum. I have been practicing the diaphragm breathing while in my car during the long commute home – nothing better to do 🙂

    Pompadur
    Participant
    Post count: 39

    O’k i see…
    And how does it go Jaeme? Do you feel any improvement? In the austrian study they talk about 30 minutes a day excersising. How long does it take you to excersise?

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Pompadur – I have about a half hour ride to work and then half hour ride home each day, and I try to do the exercises during that time (simply breathing deep using the diaphragm/belly, holding it for a count of 5-10, then breath out slowly while trying to keep belly pushing outward). I guess I exercise about 15 minutes of the half hour each way, so about the 30 minutes per day mentioned in the study. I think I feel improvement, but I am also improved from following the Fast Tract diet.

    Pompadur
    Participant
    Post count: 39

    Thank you very much Jaeme!
    I will try to incorporate breathing exercises to my plan. It looks rather promising.

    Pompadur
    Participant
    Post count: 39

    Another one related article http://www.news-medical.net/news/20120710/Diaphragm-muscles-show-osteopathic-training-potential.aspx

    They talk about mystery “osteopathic manipulation, involving a diaphragm-stretching technique commonly used by osteopathic physicians to obtain functional equilibrium of the muscles”.

    I wonder why there are so many articles about excersises for LES function and NO video or complete instructions! I dream to have video wшth these “osteopathic manipulation” !

    Pompadur
    Participant
    Post count: 39

    Just another one link

    “Respiratory physiotherapy can increase lower esophageal sphincter pressure in GERD patients” Renata Carvalho de Miranda Chavesemail address, Milena Suesada, Fabiane Polisel, Cláudia Cristina de Sá, Tomas Navarro-Rodriguez
    Received 21 May 2012; accepted 29 August 2012. published online 01 October 2012.

    As i understand (sorry for my bad english 🙁 ) in the study they use some trainer like POWERbreathe or smth. But in the end they conclude:
    IMT (Inspiratory muscle training) increased LES pressure in patients with GERD, in both the treatment and sham groups, after an eight-week program. Although there was no statistically significant difference between groups, suggesting the pressure increase in LES occurs regardless of the resistance load of the threshold IMT.

    It means that even without physiotherapy trainer excersises must help!
    And it is rather easy to find “Inspiratory muscle training” in YouTube! Finally it seems that i found something like instructions…

    And one more newr study – also looks promising:

    Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2013 Dec;305(11):G862-7. doi: 10.1152/ajpgi.00054.2013. Epub 2013 Oct 10.
    Inspiratory muscle training improves antireflux barrier in GERD patients.
    Nobre e Souza MÂ1, Lima MJ, Martins GB, Nobre RA, Souza MH, de Oliveira RB, dos Santos AA.
    Abstract
    The crural diaphragm (CD) is an essential component of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ), and inspiratory exercises may modify its function. This study’s goal is to verify if inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improves EGJ motility and gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Twelve GER disease [GERD; 7 males, 20-47 yr, 9 esophagitis, and 3 nonerosive reflex disease (NERD)] and 7 healthy volunteers (3 males, 20-41 yr) performed esophageal pH monitoring, manometry, and heart rate variability (HRV) studies. A 6-cm sleeve catheter measured average EGJ pressure during resting, peak inspiratory EGJ pressures during sinus arrhythmia maneuver (SAM) and inhalations under 17-, 35-, and 70-cmH2O loads (TH maneuvers), and along 1 h after a meal. GERD patients entered a 5-days-a-week IMT program. One author scored heartburn and regurgitation before and after IMT. IMT increased average EGJ pressure (19.7 ± 2.4 vs. 29.5 ± 2.1 mmHg; P < 0.001) and inspiratory EGJ pressure during SAM (89.6 ± 7.6 vs. 125.6 ± 13.3 mmHg; P = 0.001) and during TH maneuvers. The EGJ-pressure gain across 35- and 70-cmH2O loads was lower for GERD volunteers. The number and cumulative duration of the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations decreased after IMT. Proximal progression of GER decreased after IMT but not the distal acid exposure. Low-frequency power increased after IMT and the higher its increment the lower the increment of supine acid exposure. IMT decreased heartburn and regurgitation scores. In conclusion, IMT improved EGJ pressure, reduced GER proximal progression, and reduced GERD symptoms. Some GERD patients have a CD failure, and IMT may prove beneficial as a GERD add-on treatment.

    So we have few small studies here. All rather promising and they all make a sense that it worth trying exercising.

    I would love to read also the article about osteopathic manipulations (that i mentioned earlier), but i am not sure that the full text of the article contains the exact technic they used in the study. And as it costs 35$ i hesitate 😀

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