Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • Ellen D
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Since foods in combination have a different GI than the individual foods taken separately (which was actually studied in the case of mashed potatoes: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21338539), I am wondering how this affects the FP of the meal as a whole. The reason I ask is the experience I’ve recently had: I had a small serving of mashed potatoes as part of my dinner and experienced discomfort later on in the evening. The meal as a whole had an FP around 9 (chicken, small portion of zucchini, and mashed potatoes) so it was really well within the FT Diet guidelines.
    Now I’m wondering whether it’s safe to use the GI of a food to calculate its FP when it’s eaten along with foods that reduce the GI of the meal significantly.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Hi Ellen, True enough. Here’s my take on it. Even though mixed meals, adding fats, etc. will effect the glycemic index, all things being equal, you’re still better off choosing low FP (higher GI) foods. Also, I recall reading a study I’ll post the reference if I find it) concluding that the GI lowering effect observed when starch and fats are consumed together involves interaction between amylose (not amylopectin) starch and the fat. So high amylopectin starches may be less subject to this effect.

    Of course, if you were really concerned, you could minimize FP by consuming starches in isolation, it might be easier to just consume a little less, eat slowly and chew well.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Ellen,
    I have confirmed that fat forms hard to digest complexes with only one form of starch, amylose, not amylopectin. For this reason, high amylopectin starches (jasmine rice, red potatoes, etc.) are much better choices for SIBO conditions.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Interesting info Norm! I hypothesize that this may be the true cause of some of the complaints people have about fat causing digestion issues. They blame the butter or olive oil or meat instead of the bread, high amylose potatoes, or grains/beans they ate the fat with? Some people may have true issues with fat, but for others it may be the combo with the amylose? A friend commented to me about the huge increase in gallbaldder removals in recent years – could this be associated with those hard-to-digest fat & amylose complexes you mentioned above? Especially with the focus on eating all of those high amylose whole grains?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    That would be something to investigate. Most cases (cholecystitis) involve gallstones composed of cholesterol and bilirubin, a pigment in bile. I recall one study that found bacteria were often present with this condition but haven’t read anything involving dietary fat/starch. But you never know.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Thanks Norm – its amazing how much new info is being discovered about gut microbes and the myriad of interactions within the body. Thank you for your good work 🙂

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.