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General Q&A on Fast Tract Diet

//General Q&A on Fast Tract Diet
General Q&A on Fast Tract Diet2014-02-02T14:30:36+00:00

Fast Tract Diet for SIBO Forum Fast Tract Diet Q&A General Q&A on Fast Tract Diet

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 72 total)
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  • Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    This comment by Lana (migrated from discontinued thread)
    “So glad to see the forum up and running! I have a question about fiber and GI. In particular, I’m looking at carrots. In looking up various GI’s, I’ve discovered a site by Michel Montignac. It has some interesting info on it about the Glycemic Index. He lists raw carrots as having a GI of 20 as opposed to the 49 of cooked carrots. When I plug that into the FP formula I’m getting raw carrots as having an FP of 8.5 for 100 grams.
    My question is this… as some fibers have low fermentability, would a food with these fibers cause less problems than another food with an equal FP that contains fiber with high fermentability? By what I’m reading, carrots are high in cellulose and pectin – both low fermentability.
    In thinking about carrots and fiber, I’m now scratching my head about asparagus which I love! It has a low FP but it’s high in Fructans which are highly fermentable. Should we be limiting the amount of asparagus we eat?! You can picture me with my eyes rolling in circles trying to make sense of this!”

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Hi Norm,

    Thank you for your forum. Since I am new to the FTD (my book is to arrive Tuesday), I have a few questions (my apologies if they are answered in the book):

    1.) Your research shows that fats are the easiest on the digestive system, yet others claim fats are the hardest to digest, make the LES weak and delay the emptying of the stomach. Any clarification on why the others promote this idea?

    2.) Have you seen any issues with blood lipids due to the high fat diet? I have always eaten a diet high in good fats (olive oil, nuts, grass-fed eggs, meat & dairy, cold-water fish), no processed or fried foods, and fairly low carb (but whole grain, which you say is a no-no). I have always had stellar blood work with an HDL-LDL ratio that put me at the very bottom of the scale for heart risk. One of the reasons I was not happy with the no-fat/low-acid/high-carb diet- I was afraid of blood sugars and bad blood results.

    3.) Does sprouting/soaking grains help? I have always made steel-cut oats by soaking overnight in either whey or yogurt (lactofermentation) to breakdown some of the components that prevent release of nutrients and to make it easier to digest. According to historians, this is the way grains were eaten until a century or two ago, as our ancestors knew these grains were not digestible “as is”?

    4.) Do you have any thoughts about the mainstream idea that certain foods weaken the LES, such as coffee, chocolate, mint, etc.?

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Is the FT diet considered a low carb or a very low carb diet?

    How long do you stay on the FT diet, or is this a permanent change?

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    If I skip the desserts (like the cheesecake), should I substitute something else or will the diet work without desserts?

    Will a single date fruit and a handful of nuts work in place of the Sweetened Nut Mix?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    I Jaeme, Many of your questions are covered in the book. After reading the book, please feel free to post any remaining questions.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Sorry for all of the questions, Norm – just an excited “newbie” trying to figure it all out and do it right. BTW – Day 3 on the FT diet, and my LPR coughing has subsided considerably, nasal passages clearer, not bringing up wads of throat mucus. Keeping fingers crossed 🙂

    Do you have any thoughts for Lana’s questions above about carrots and asparagus?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    No problem Jaeme. Very happy to see you improving. I looked around but didn’t find Lana’s question. Do you remember what forum she asked it in?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Jaeme, Any diet works better without the desserts! But many of us just have a sweet tooth.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Lana’s questions were reposted under your name as the first entry in this thread (from a deleted thread). Also, what is the FP of lactose-free milk?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Oh, right. Thanks Jaeme.
    Yes, good observation Lana. Raw carrots have a lower GI (16) and higher FP – I get slightly higher FP of 8.9 for 100 grams due to the GI of 16. I agree with your point about lower fermentability equals less likely to cause symptoms. Pectin is more fermentable than cellulose. Higher cellulose veggies are likely much more tolerable.

    There has not been a GI value established for asparagus. I estimate the GI as 50 for the FP calculation. The presence of fructans do lower GI and increase FP, but given that asparagus have so few carbs to begin with, it should not matter all that much. For instance, suppose the GI was 35 or 40. The FP would changes only slightly. I love asparagus too!

    From a previous post: Lactose-free milk would be lower than regular milk, but I don’t have an actual value for it. Assume it’s in the range of about 3-4 for the same serving size. That is to account for other oligosaccharides in milk.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Great! Thanks Norm! I love asparagus too 🙂

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    FYI – the “word” is spreading! I was at a pharmacy tonight, and the clerk told me I was the second person in the last week that had mentioned SIBO and the concepts Norm has brought to light.

    Also, a friend of mine who is dealing with Candida/gluten/etc. found out on his own about the GERD meds. He had been following a diet similar to Norm’s for a while, and one day forgot to take his Pepcid AC. He noticed he was not having GERD symptoms anymore, and quit taking it with no problems. 🙂

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    If you had a like box on that post, I’d check it! Good news indeed. I hope more doctors writing the prescriptions hear the news.

    george72
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    Was curious what Dr. Robillard’s and other people’s thoughts are on this study:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/too-much-protein-could-lead-to-early-death-study-says/2014/03/04/0af0603e-a3b5-11e3-8466-d34c451760b9_story.html

    Forgive my lack of memory and knowledge of this, but I think I read somewhere on this forum and elsewhere online that sometimes a higher fat, lower protein diet is recommended for GERD. What would a one day meal plan look like for that sort of dietary approach?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Hey George,
    Thanks for this question. There has been a bit of press about this issue lately. The best response I have seen on this report is from from Paul Jaminet. I agree fully.

    As for GERD and IBS, the Fast Tract diet does not have set limits for protein, fat and carbohydrate levels as it’s based on the fermentation potential and people have different dietary requirements depending on their life stile and other criteria. In general, I recommend a diet with about 15 – 25% protein and up to 60 – 70% healthy fats (by calories, remembering that fat has twice the calories as protein or carbohydrate per gram) with the rest made up of low FP carbohydrates. But, as I said the ratio can vary based on the personal preferences, but consuming more than 30% of calories in protein is probably not a great idea.

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