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General autoimmune

General autoimmune2014-02-03T01:31:09+00:00
Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    There are definitely connections between gut bacteria and a number of autoimmune conditions such as ankylosing spondylitis, AS (K. pneumonia) and rheumatoid arthritis, RA (Prevotella copri) for example. In a way, autoimmune conditions are at the heart of discussions on gut inflammation and leaky gut. One idea is that “feeding our gut microbes with fiber and resistant starch will preferentially feed “healthy” gut bacteria such as bifidobacteria, prevent leaky gut and reduce or control autoimmune reactions. The other school of thought is that excessive fermentation, particularly when it occurs in the small intestine, will increase leaky gut and autoimmune reactions implying that less fermentation (the Fast Tract Diet approach) is the superior prevention strategy. What do you think and what have your experiences been.

    AussieNana
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    While I can understand that if fermentation is excessive and causing pain and bloating the obvious idea is to reduce fermentation. However why is that happening? Wouldn’t it be better to optimise the digestive process to stop the fermentation happening too early in the gut? If its happening in the stomach it could be related to low acid production and slow movement out of the stomach. When its happening in the small intestine is it an unhelpful mix of bacteria?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    That makes sense to me Aussie. Adequate stomach acid is important for sure, but there is almost no data on how many people with SIBO have low stomach acid (other than looking at people on PPIs). Pretty much everything has to be working “optimize the digestive process” – motility, adequate digestive enzymes, healthy immune system, etc.

    elle
    Participant
    Post count: 10

    after c-diff remission without drugs, I had all sorts of weird autoimmune problems such as tingling in my hands and feet, burning etc., the neurologist ruled out the obvious. I cut out gluten, corn, dairy and eggs for a period of time and I gradually reintroduced dairy and eggs…The symptoms start up again or if my lower colon is sufficiently irritated or I eat too much of something or take too many vitamins/supplements, now that happens when I have too much fiber in my diet-So I guess when ever the food item is irritating enough to my lower colon I get symptoms…

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Interesting Elle. It’s good you’re making some connections and can use what you’re learning to address your own symptoms. I agree that fiber, some of the other trigger foods your neurologist recommended limiting, and over consumption of supplements are all things that can lead to problems. Gut health usually comes from getting back to basics.

    Sarinda
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Trying to feed good gut bacteria when there is an imbalance with more bad than good bacteria is like throwing fertilizer on a lawn of weeds with only a few good patches of grass, the weeds just take over. I speak from personal experience with this as prebiotics, fiber, starches, inulin, etc.. only made matters worse. Especially, if you have SIBO, but even if you just have IBS. These supplements don’t have a chance of doing any good until the ratio of good/bad gut bacteria is balanced toward the side more good than bad. Many companies are now selling probiotics with prebiotics, this can be detrimental to many people who don’t realize they have an imbalance and make people much worse. I would always try to find a probiotic without prebiotics or food to be on the safe side or get tested and find out if there is an imbalance.

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