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Differences in composition of greek yogurts!

//Differences in composition of greek yogurts!
Differences in composition of greek yogurts!2014-12-27T17:48:18+00:00

Fast Tract Diet for SIBO Forum Fast Tract Diet Q&A Differences in composition of greek yogurts!

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210

    So I was noticing extra heartburn while consuming one of my favorite greek yogurts. I happen to have two brands in my fridge right now. I was SHOCKED when I read the labels as to the differenc in composition of the two, in terms of fat/protein ratio. Both have the same amount of lactose. But the protein and fat ratios are almost REVERSED between the two. When you read the ingredients list alone, they both look similar, with no additives. Since I am still trouble shooting on the intro diet, I am trying to lower my protein and up my fats and obviously one of these brands is going to be much better for me right now!

    So the first brand (was) my go-to. Fage, Full Fat Greek Yogurt: 1cup serving: 11 g of Fat, 9 g sugar, 20 g. of protein (a cup of this- I usually have less, would be almost my total daily allotment of protein!)

    The second brand is Trader Joes Plain Greek Yogurt, 1 cup serving: 18 g of fat, 9 grams of sugar, 9 grams of protien! For the intro diet, this one seems MUCH safer if you are having any trouble with proteins.

    Greek Gods Yogurt, full fat, which can be found at other specialty markets or ask your store to carry Greek Gods has higher fat and sugar listed (but the microbes probably take care of most of this) and similar protein to the Trader Joes (not nearly as high as Fage)

    FAGE is VERY thick, so it must have to do with the way the yogurnt is strained. The other greek styles are lighter, with higher fat content. Hope this helps someone 🙂

    Kelly
    Participant
    Post count: 77

    Why would protein cause a problem? I don’t remember reading anything about that in the book.

    I’ve read that we need about 1g protein/day for every 2lb body weight, so limiting to a little over 20g seems it could cause other problems.

    ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210

    Hi Kelly
    In the troubleshooting section of the book if you are still symptomatic it is recommended to lower protein and increase fat, because some bacteria eat protein and I think actually convert it to carbohydrates? But not sure. Pretty sure some SIBO overgowing bacteria eat protein and it may need to be limited if still symptomatic after the first 2 weeks, which I was.

    ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210

    For my weight, less than 20 g per day would be a problem. For SIBO, more than 30g might be too much.

    ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210

    Dr. Robillard talks about it in terms of percentages: If still symptomatic, increase fats to 60-70% of total calories. If peole have fat malabsorbtion that is another issue.

    Kelly
    Participant
    Post count: 77

    Thank you bearsmom. That must not have registered in my mind, because I have to eat boatloads of protein for other reasons, and most non-meat fat sources disagree with me. Fortunately I have other theories for the symptoms I still have.

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