Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 35 total)
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  • Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    Thanks Norm – my local coffee shop roasts it own beans and makes its own flavored coffee beans. I will see if they can tell me the exact ingredients in the flavoring (wondering about sugar alcohols – how do they get the flavoring to infuse the beans?) Which leads me to another question – pure extract flavorings like vanilla and almond still have alcohol and even corn syrup in them. Enough to affect FPs?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Reportedly, most of the sugar alcohol is reportedly are roasted away leaving residual flavoring. Again, don’t have scientific proof, but it makes sense.

    Jaeme
    Participant
    Post count: 348

    That’s good, and yes, makes sense. I will have to monitor with smoothies and flavoring coconut milk to drink straight up.

    Kelly
    Participant
    Post count: 77

    When calculating the FP, where can I find the amount of sugar alcohol in foods? I have searched all over, and it’s not in any nutrition database I’ve found. Thanks!

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Great question Kc. When sugar alcohols are added to foods, by law they need to be listed on the label so those are easy. But naturally occurring sugar alcohols in foods are a different story and the data is very limited here. Even the question of whether or not there are any (natural) sugar alcohols in a given food can be challenging. One thing that might help is this. I understand that the standard dietary fiber test method used in the US (I don’t have the AOAC official test method number handy, but could likely find it) for determining total dietary fiber (the results of this test are listed on the food labels/nutritional fact sheets) includes sugar alcohols in the fiber fraction. In other words, sugar alcohols might be included in the total dietary fiber amount on the label for foods sold in the US. Now is this methodology used in all cases? I’m not sure, but that is the best I can do for the moment. I plan on digging into this further in the future. Hopefully some analytical chemists with more expertise in this area will chime in and enlighten us further.

    Kelly
    Participant
    Post count: 77

    Thanks Norm. I know how to recognize the sugar alcohols in the ingredients list, but I’ve never seen the amounts listed. Then again, I haven’t eaten any processed food in a very long time.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    I support you there Kc. I try to minimize processed foods myself. I’ll have to check next time I look at some labels as to how many list the actual amount of sugar alcohols. Here is an example where they do include the amount: http://www.breyers.com/product/detail/113831/carbsmart-chocolate

    finny
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    Where do you look to find the sugar alcohol values for food in order to calculate the FP? Nutritional charts have the sugars listed, but that doesn’t tell you what kind of sugar it has. Do you use the grams of sugar listed instead?

    I have the Heartburn FTD book. Is the diet for IBS the same?

    Kelly
    Participant
    Post count: 77

    Haha Norm, it’s not entirely my choice to religiously avoid processed food. I have sensitivities to absolutely everything. I hope FTD will alleviate at least some of them.

    Finny, look at Norm’s reply above. When it’s not listed, apparently the best you can do is just leave SA out of the formula and hope it was included in the fiber.

    ronnie
    Participant
    Post count: 18

    Hi Norm,

    I LOVE peanut butter. I’ve seen a couple of posts between the different types of nuts, but is there anything to suggest that the FP for peanut butter would be any different? What would you estimate the FP of peanut butter to be per tablespoon?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Hi Ronnie,
    The FP is 5 grams for a 1.1 ounce serving.

    lyonsden10
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Just finished the book and am going to try this to help my aching belly! Because I am so chemically sensitive, I cannot eat many of the foods on the 14 day menu, so am calculating myself.

    Just want to check my spreadsheet math 🙂 for two foods:

    Hemp seed: I calculated that the FP would be 3 for 1 oz. based on:
    FP=(((100-0)*2)/100)+1+0
    These were the values I could find. (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/custom/629104/2)

    Sachi inchi (savi seeds): I couldn’t find glycemic index, but did this calculation:
    =(((100-0)*5)/100)+5+0
    (http://myvega.com/product/vega-saviseeds/ Nutrition tab for natural)

    Can someone please let me know if this seems correct?

    All my other foods were, thankfully, on the list!

    Thanks,
    Susan

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    H Susan,
    Good try. Here’s how to work through it. Keep in mind that net carbs are equal to total carbs minus fiber (I should make that note in the book).

    Hemp seed: FP for 1 oz (28 grams)
    The net carbs are total carbs minus fiber, or 1 gram net carbs and 1 gram fiber. I would assume a GI of about 20 for the net carbs (similar to peanuts). So the equation is:
    FP=(((100-20)*1)/100)+1+0 = 1.8 grams. Since the net carbs are so low, the GI doesn’t really matter much. Even assuming a GI of zero for the net carbs, the answer would be 2 grams FP.

    Sachi inchi (savi seeds): Here is the FP calculation based on 5 grams net carbs (9 grams total carbs minus 4 grams fiber) and 4 grams fiber. Since 4 of the 5 grams net carbs are sugar, I am assigning the GI for sugar (59) to the entire net carb amount of 5 grams just to simplify things:

    FP=(((100-59)*5)/100)+4+0 = 6 grams

    lyonsden10
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Hi Norm,
    Thank you so much for helping me out with this. Yes, I didn’t see that, and I didn’t know so that would be helpful for “newbies” like me.

    Thanks again for your help. Sure wish prunes weren’t such an FP hog! They are great for osteoporosis. Ah well.

    Great book. Looking forward to some relief soon.

    Susan

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Once your symptoms are under control, you can fool around with some higher FP foods. People react differently to fiber, fructose and other carbs. One good rule of thumb: Try smaller servings at first, eat slowly and chew each bit to infinity.

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