Fast Tract Diet for SIBO Forum Fast Tract Recipes Baking & Fast Tract

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 55 total)
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  • cmcuk
    Participant
    Post count: 40

    if you can decipher my posts with the ypos – thanks and apologies!

    cmcuk
    Participant
    Post count: 40

    or even typos…

    Irina_RN
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    Hi All,

    sorry for not posting the brownie recipe. I’m still working on it. My symptoms came back before I could finalize the recipe and I’ve had to put baking experiments on hold until I can get my symptoms under control again.
    Will post recipes again once my symptoms have remitted.

    Sorry,
    Irina

    sivert
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    I also love baking – and I have baked my own bread for years, I don’t think store bought bread tastes any good! I have recently changed my diet to follow Fast Tract (because of IBS), but I get a craving for bread sometimes. My basic bread recipe is this:

    1/2 liter of cold water from the tap
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon dry yeast
    600 g ordinary wheat flour
    Mix it all together and let it rise in the fridge overnight or longer. Using 2 spoons (dough is sticky), put 12 buns on oven plate covered with baking paper, bake at 200C for 20-22 minutes.

    I cut each of the 12 buns in 4 pieces and froze them.

    My wheat flour has 71 g carbohydrates and 4,1 g fiber per 100 g, so using a GI of 70 for white bread (from the book), I find that my 1/4 bun has a FP = 3.2. That seems OK to incorporate in the diet, not every day maybe, but when the craving pops up…

    But I would love to hear from others here if the calculation looks correct

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    I wish I had your bread-making skills Sivert. I wonder about substituting some/most of the wheat flour with tapioca, rice or almond flour for an even friendlier bread recipe – especially for people who don’t tolerate wheat/gluten. Any ideas about such a recipe?

    ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210

    Hi Norm
    In you book you mention that scones have a low FP, and muffins have a moderate to high FP. This is very confusing, as one could (and yes, I have!) made scones with whole grain flours in the past. Those would NOT be considered low FP! And couldn’t one make “muffins” with low FP white rice flour, tapioca as has been discussed here, or even white spelt flour, if tolerated? The difference between “scones” and muffins is simply that scones use a bit more leavening and COLD BUTTER to make the texture happen, and muffins often use less leavening agents and oils as added fats. Otherwise flour ingredients vary widely, and are interchangeable. So I don’t see why I could not make a low FP “muffin”?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    I understand Bearsmom. The FP for each of these foods are based on actual tested glycemic indices for each of the foods in question. As you are more aware than I, the recipes are different yielding a different consistency and different GIs. If you make muffins from different types of flours or make other recipe changes, you could certainly change the GI and hence the FP. For this reason, we have been adding the FP for different types of flours to the new versions of the books.

    The real lesson from the Fast Tract Diet books is that what foods are made of and how they are made affect the FP. That awareness should drive lots of curiosity on all of our parts to understand this ever better and find more safe, low FP foods we can eat.

    If you do make a low FP muffin, please post your recipe. I would love to give them a try.

    sivert
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    Well, really not much skill is needed to make just plain bread…
    I have tried several different gluten free bread recipes in the past, but it’s much harder because the structure provided by the gluten is missing.

    The best gluten free recipe that I ever found (that used rice and buckwheat flour among other things) used powdered psyllium seed husks to provide the structure, and that will make the FP much higher, as it consists of dietary fiber and nothing else. I could go back and do a rough calculation for that recipe and see if I could substitute some of th high-FP ingredients.

    A propos tapioca starch, I have searched for it in several stores and haven’t found it. At one health food store, they told me that they carried arrowroot instead, but I didn’t buy it because I didn’t know the FP. Is it posted somewhere here in the forums? I couldn’t find it… My Asian shop had tapioca pearls, but that’s not what is meant by tapioca starch, is it?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Thanks for looking into this. Yes, how to compensate for gluten, that’s a good question. With all the flourless cakes, and other gluten free recipes, there has to be a way to make a low FP bread with less or now wheat. As for arrowroot, the FP is 10 grams for 1/4 cup (32 grams). My tapioca flour is made by Ener G – http://www.amazon.com/Ener-Flour-Tapioca-16-Ounce-Pack/dp/B00473TZY8/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1415674929&sr=8-2&keywords=ener+g+tapioca

    ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210
    Akavery
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    Hi, just wondering about the FP for Tapioca Starch. In the book in the FP tables I see “Tapioca, boiled” listed in the flour section. Would that be the same as Tapioca starch?

    Also, I’m a little confused about bread made from any medium since it would be a starch or grain that is cooked and then cooled. Doesn’t cooking and then cooling a starch or a grain cause it to build up to 3 x the resistant starch?? In this case, wouldn’t only fresh, hot bread be safe and bread that has cooled down would no longer be good? I’m mostly through the book so I’m still new at this 🙂

    Last, does coco or unsweetened chocolate have an FP value? I didn’t see one listed for just strait coco with no sugar added. Thanks so much!

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    OMG those look delicious! Thanks for the link. I am going to try this recipe. I will use lactose-free milk in place of regular. I don’t have the mini muffin pan, but will pick one up.

    ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210

    Norm, let us know how they go. And sometimes in baking (I have baked a million muffins for my kids!!!) I substitue the milk for 1/2 cream and 1/2 water, or JUST cream! Yum! ALso, cream works really well in scone recipes.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Akavery,
    Generally any isolated starches have a higher GI (lower FP) than the corresponding flour.
    ” In this case, wouldn’t only fresh, hot bread be safe and bread that has cooled down would no longer be good?”
    This is a good point you make. We generally think about rice and potatoes when talking about cooking then cooling increasing resistant starch, but you point seems valid to me. Eating bread warm is likely better. Stale bread would likely have the most RS.

    Akavery
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    So, does boiled tapioca referee to in the flour section the same as tapioca flour? Thanks for your response! Yea, I’ll prob just have to stay away from most breads and starches for awhile while I’m new at this since they seem the most iffy 🙂

    What about chocolate? Does unsweetened coco have an FP? I tried to find the GI for just coco powder and could not find it, but only the GI for a sweetened chocolate bar. Just wondering if we know the FP for coco. Thanks!

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