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Baking & Fast Tract

//Baking & Fast Tract
Baking & Fast Tract2014-08-12T22:22:35+00:00

Fast Tract Diet for SIBO Forum Fast Tract Recipes Baking & Fast Tract

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 55 total)
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  • Irina_RN
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    Hi,

    I love baking! I have no problems restricting my diet as much I need to in order to have results (I’m on my second day and I already feel my symptoms improving) but in order to keep my sanity, i need to bake!
    I bake with gluten free flours (mostly walnut meal) since I react severely to gluten. So far, I have no problem keeping my daily FP values to 30 or below.
    I have a question about cassava flour, AKA tapioca starch: there is no mention that tapioca is boiled prior to being ground to a starch and my calculations using raw cassava yield a significantly lower FP value than the boiled tapioca one in the book. For 1/2 cup (makes 16 brownies), i get an FP value of 17.2 using the value in the book, but if i use the values for raw cassava (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2389/2) i have an FP value of 10.2 (using the same glycemic index).
    Granted, it only makes a difference of 0.5FP per brownie, but I’d still like to know. Any help?

    cmcuk
    Participant
    Post count: 40

    from a post by Norm in May
    Making bread by adding tapioca is also a great idea. The grains table in FTD IBS (now added to FTD Heartburn in the ebook and soon to follow in the print book) lists tapioca but the FP was updated to correct a typo. The GI is actually 81 (not 46 as originally reported) and the FP is only 5 grams for a 1.1 ounce serving.

    don’t know if that changes anything in terms of what you are using. Also, surely once you bake it it is no longer raw and so that FP would change?
    Probably not helpful, but just a couple of thoughts…..
    BTW would love to hear lots from you about baking, I am finding doing without baked goods a bit tricky to say that least..!

    Irina_RN
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    thank you for your reply 🙂
    I wasn’t sure how the FP value would be affected during the heating process; does the same occur for other ingredients (nuts, chocolate, etc)?
    I read in his book that FP decreases with baking/cooking, which is where some of my confusion comes from: my FP value is lower using the raw value as opposed to the boiled one. Also, I looked online to see the processing of cassava into starch flour, and there was no mention of boiling it or any other heat-applying process before it’s converted into starch. On the other hand, raw cassava is poisonous (it contains toxic levels of cyanide), and while several sources via Google state that the cyanide is removed from tapioca starch, there’s no mention of how that’s done.

    So far, I’ve been using the higher total FP value in my daily calculations just to be on the safe side and my brownies are 5.04 FP per brownie.
    I’m currently developing a recipe for brownies that would bring the value down to 3.6 but my first test was not super successful.
    I’ll happily share the recipe when I think it’s worth sharing, lol.
    And baking is SUPER important to me!
    I’m only on my third day of the diet and although I feel better than I have in months, since my SIBO is quite severe I imagine I’ll be following a strict protocol for a while… which means I’ll have to come up with some sort of bread/wrap recipe eventually. If there’s interest in baking while on the FTD protocol, i’ll happily share my recipes 🙂

    Irina_RN
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    so I went back over my calculations to double check everything and I realized I made a crucial error (well, 2 really).
    First, I used an average GI of 50 to calculate FP, when in the book it clearly states, as you mentioned, that the GI is 81. This brought my FP down to 9.03 for 1/2 cup (the amount required for 16 brownies).
    Second, I made an egregious error when it comes to baking: I didn’t use my scale! I assumed 1/2 cup of tapioca was 103g (based on the raw cassava values) but tapioca starch is extremely fluffy and light! 1/2 cup weighs only 63g! Using this information, the FP value using values from the book comes out to 10 FP per 1/2 cup of tapioca starch, extremely close to the 9.03 I calculated above using raw cassava.

    Lesson of the day: when baking, never ever forget your scale!!

    whooops….

    Irina_RN
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    btw, this now brings my FP value for brownies to only 4.04!
    This makes me so happy. I can afford to eat 3 brownies a day instead of just 2; and really, isn’t everything better when you can eat an extra brownie (or is that just me?) 😀

    JI
    Participant
    Post count: 180

    Yes, Irina, brownies do make life better! I’ve said this many times on this forum, but Norm’s cheesecake recipe from the Fast Tract Diet Heartburn book is very, very good. It uses almond flour for the crust. I do put foil around the edges of the crust as they tend to burn otherwise. I love baking, too! 🙂

    cmcuk
    Participant
    Post count: 40

    am feeling very heartened by all of this discussion! will look forward to recipe sharing and am really pleased we have been joined by someone who is so determined to find ways to bring brownies to the FTD diet and community!!!
    brownies will make all our lives better!!
    Thanks
    C

    AndreaS
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    *nod* *nod* very true! Sweets are rare in FTD land. I want to try these brownies, too!

    BTW, not baked but good and very simple: Palline di ricotta e cocco. That’s basically a dry fresh cheese (Italian Ricotta) mixed with grated coconut. I replaced the sugar with dextrose and the coconut (which has a relatively high FP) with whatever fits, for instance puffed rice or cornflakes. Just mix, form balls and roll them in a flour (or grated coconut). Fridge. 🙂

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Wow, I am enjoying the discussion and very interested in this topic. With your help, I am sure we will soon see more low FP treats. I continue to look into Tapioca and also have questions regarding boiled tapioca vs it’s use in baking. Baking temperatures can create more resistant starch, but at least you are starting with flour from a lower FP plant. I would recommend a small dose of caution, but from my own use of tapioca for deep frying, it seems very GI friendly on my own gut.

    ps: Some extra info on Tapioca:
    Cassava flour is mostly carbs with 70 percent amylopectin and 20 percent amylose. Cooked cassava starch has a digestibility of over 75 percent. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassava
    Per the Tapioca Flour package (Ener-G), there are 42 grams of total (and net) carbs and no fiber per 50 g serving. This is consistent with the Fast Tract Digestion FP table value of 25 grams carbs per 30 grams flour. You can find the mfg. nutritional facts here: http://www.ener-g.com/catalog/product/gallery/id/240/image/728/
    Note: The nutritional facts are incorrect on the nutritionaldata.self.com site. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/custom/1275851/1?print=true
    Making Tapioca and other info:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tapioca

    Irina_RN
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    wow, this kind of blew up. very cool to see so much interest in baking. I was going to try a new test batch this weekend but I think I’ll try it tomorrow and see how it goes!

    Norm, a follow-up question for you: I’ve been using nutritionaldata.self.com site in my calculations for honeydew FP values (there’s an FP value for cantaloupe but none for honeydew and I wasn’t sure if it would be the same). If that website is incorrect, where can I find correct nutritional data on various foods that might not be in the book?

    this is super exciting!

    also, this may be a stupid question, but what about herbs? do they have a 0 FP value?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Hi Irina, Thanks for joining the effort to expand low FP eating! You have some good ideas. I think your assumption about honydew having a similar FP as cantaloupe is a good one.

    I first go to the USDA National Nutrient Database site first to investigate nutritional facts. For products, I also try to get an actual food label or image of one on line. Nutritionaldata.self.com is my third and perhaps less reliable source.

    Irina_RN
    Participant
    Post count: 13

    Hi All,

    I’ll be baking the brownies today but I got inspired yesterday and revised my chocolate chip cookies to be FDT friendly. I used to eat these all the time!
    The recipe is from Zenbelly (http://zenbellyblog.com/2013/01/05/chocolate-chip-cookies-like-you-remember-em/) with a few substitutions and changes.

    Let me know what you think!

    FP value: 2.92 FP / cookie (with maple syrup); 2.43 FP / cookie (without maple syrup)

    Ingredients:
    1/4 C softened unsalted butter(see note below)
    1/4 C dextrose (see note below)
    1 egg, room temperature (see note below)
    2 teaspoons (t) vanilla extract
    2 tablespoons (T) maple syrup (see note below)
    1 Cup (C) almond or walnut flour
    1/2 C Tapioca starch
    1/2 t baking soda
    1/2 t sea salt
    1/2 C chocolate chips (see note below)

    Method (I changed the method from the original only slightly; I tried both and I prefer mine):
    1. preheat oven to 350F. Line 2 9″x13″ baking sheets with parchment paper
    2. in a medium bowl, cream together the sugar and butter (smoosh them together using the back of a spoon) until mixture is homogenous
    3. add the egg, vanilla extract, and maple syrup. Whisk together (you’ll still have small clumps of butter; that’s fine)
    4 add the nut flour, tapioca starch, baking soda, and sea salt. Combine together until homogenous (you don’t want any to see any clumps of starch or baking soda or flour). I use a whisk to combine
    5. Fold in the chocolate chips.
    6. Drop the batter onto the parchment lined baking sheet using a cookie scoop or tablespoon. Have only 12 cookies per baking pan (you don’t want them to crowd each other)
    7. Bake for 10-12 min (this depends on your oven, mine are ready after 8 minutes). You’re looking for the bottom edges to be slightly browned
    8. let cool in the baking pan for 10 min. Then cool completely on a baking rack (if you can hold out that long!)

    Notes:
    Butter & Egg: Its extremely important for the butter to be softened and the egg to be at room temp (it’ll keep the cookies from drying out after they’re baked). If you forget to take them out ahead of time, like I always do, you can microwave 1/4C refrigerated butter for 10 sec and put the egg in a bowl with warm water for 5 min to come to room temp.

    Maple Syrup: I haven’t found a suitable FDT alternative for maple syrup. There’s not a lot in there, I believe it’s used as a flavoring agent. You can omit it if you want but the cookie may lack a bit of moisture if you do. If you omit maple syrup, try adding a bit of almond milk/heavy cream if you find the cookies come out dry.

    Almond flour: I use walnut meal instead since I have 30 pounds of it at home and it has a lower FP value but almond flour may be easier to source.

    Chocolate Chips: I highly recommend the “Enjoy Life” Dark chocolate chips because they have only 3 ingredients (cocoa butter, cocoa mass, and brown sugar). I based my FP calculations on this brand of chocolate chips; be aware that your FP calculations might change if you use different brands.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Wow, impressive work Irina. Thanks for posting this recipe. I will definitely be trying your version out.

    Akavery
    Participant
    Post count: 9

    Irina, could you post your brownie recipe as well? I’m so excited to know that I’ll be able to have some sweets again eventually cuz the other diets I was looking at pretty much cut that out. Thanks for sharing!

    cmcuk
    Participant
    Post count: 40

    have been explring the david gillespie no sugar recipe book. The flourless chocolate tart is lovely and quite low FP! yey!
    did wnat to ask though – can’t see an FP for plain white flour (may be that I don’t know how to read the types of names for flour in the US). Any information gratefully recieved (even if it turns out I am just being a bit dense!)
    Thanks

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