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  • Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Here is a place to discuss the connection between GERD and asthma.

    dalbers
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    Well I definately have a fair bit of both, I notice that the type of diet that reduces or eliminates my GERD also has me less asthmatic in general.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Hi Dal,
    That would not surprise me a bit. There is definitely a connection and the SARA study showed it wasn’t from the refluxing of stomach acid, but what about bile, bacteria, pepsin, etc.?

    Mostly happy you have observed that addressing GERD with diet helps with your asthma.

    bandaadnan
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    To try help people for Asthma and GERD need to stay close to them.To share experience,advices,treatments.You may Start from [url=http://pkton.netau.net/majakel.php] here [/url].

    jiujitsuguy
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    Hello
    Recently started the Fast Tract Diet and am interested in the association between GERD, SIBO and asthma. Bit of background first: I’ve had GERD for about 6 years. About a year ago I developed severe symptoms inc headache, fever, severe upper abdominal pain, cold-like symptoms of runny nose, fatigue, a general lack of stamina and poor digestion. More recently I developed shortness of breath, what i suspect to be asthma – hence the post. Keep in mind that I’m 40 and very fit. I do brazilian jiu jitsu, cardio and strength training. Underwent numerous tests for bacterial infection and eventually a colonoscopy and gastroscopy late last year. This procedure revealed a hiatus hernia and barrett’s mucosa. I was prescibed strong PPI and sucralfate tablets both of which had marginal results in reducing my symptoms. By the way i dont have stomuch ulcers.
    Before I discovered this diet I played around with my eating habits considerably, mostly with confusing and mixed results. For example, I could eat white bread but had severe gut pain after a banana and porridge (oatmeal). Anyway, I have been on the diet for a few days and it has helped a great deal. I went as far as taking myself off the medication and generally feel okay. However, I did my first workout in two weeks today and the shortness of breath returned in addition to some abdominal pain and a headache.
    My questions to anyone who may know is – if this is asthma, and it is caused by SIBO will the symptoms (affliction) disappear if i continue the diet. Is vigorous exercise okay with this SIBO related (shortness of breath) condition? Basically, will my immune system improve?
    If no one has any thoughts on the matter that’s okay, as I’ll continue with the diet and the exercise, and see what happens. I’m interested in the experiment and will post the result.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    HI JJGuy,
    I am glad you are trying the diet both for GERD and potentially related respiratory issues. I can’t comment specifically on your case, but here are a couple of thoughts on the general topic. I would recommend anyone with symptoms including shortness of breath and fever to remain under the care of a doctor just to be sure there is nothing more serious going on.

    The connection between GERD and asthma is very strong. It’s clear to me that something in reflux other than stomach acid (Refer to blog article on this site, particularly the SARA study) is exacerbating asthma. Whether that is enzymes, bacteria, bile or something else might not matter because stopping the reflux should eliminate, or significantly reduce any and all of the asthma triggers linked to reflux.

    Studies in asthmatics following fundoplication operations (known to control reflux in 90% of GERD patients) show that there is definite improvement in GERD and asthma symptoms as well as reduced asthma medicine usage when reflux is controlled. Pulmonary function, on the other hand is less responsive to the surgery. Perhaps pulmonary function may improve over time, but longer term follow up studies might be needed to fully answer this question. Here are some links to studies on this subject.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22703777
    http://commons.pacificu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1265&context=pa
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10482703
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10492285
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12809818

    Please do share your progress on the Fast Tract Diet here.

    jiujitsuguy
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    Hi Norm, thx for the prompt response and the info. Yes ill let you know how it goes for sure. Cheers

    trumpet
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    HI Norm,
    At the beginning of April I started having a big problem with Asthma. After finding little relief with medicine, my doctor suggested that it might be a stomach problem. He was right, it turns out that I have GERD. I am a professional trumpet player, 57, and maybe from the heavy use of the muscles around the LES for almost 50 years this condition has developed. I started taking PPI with some success but could never really determine what foods were helping or hurting. The asthma got better, and except for a little tingling or short pain under my left shoulder blade, I don’t have any heartburn with or without PPI. However, I am having major problems with my sinuses, throat, and bronchial tubes. I had a sinus infection 21 days ago and had to take antibiotics for 5 days until it was gone. I stopped the PPI two weeks ago and started the Fast Track Diet. After two weeks I cannot claim that my symptoms have gotten any better. Is it much too early to abandon the diet and go back to PPI? I am concerned with coming down with another sinus infection despite the use of a good nose spray. I don’t have any problems at night. I was fascinated with your book and can’t imagine taking PPI for the rest of my life. Does the lack of heartburn mean that what is coming up is not stomach acid? I live in northern Germany and know of no Doctor who is aware of your books. Do you know anyone here who I could consult? Thankyou for taking your time.
    Tom S.

    jiujitsuguy
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    Hello again

    Updating from my older posts i wanted to inform people that the diet has really worked for me. Gone are the severe abdominal pains, the cold like symptoms and fatigue and yes gone is the asthma-like symptoms. Heartburn and some bloating is still there on occasion usually when i dont stick to either my fp gram limits or i eat something that throws it way off the scale. Mashed steamed vegetables and meat have become my best friends in addition to yogurt and cream with strawberries hehe. On the down side I’ve found the diet quite difficult to stick to. Organic dark chocolate, Banana’s and tahini, roasted sweet potatoes, and porridge with dried fruit are a few of the foods ive found hard to give up. Also combining to many low fp foods in one hit is a common theme which i pay for. You really must commit and i find im hungry a lot of the time. Things i used to eat to fill me up are mostly high fp grams and ive lost quite a bit of weight. I just wanted to ask anyone out there if this is an indefinite way of eating or will life return to normal? i really would like to eat some of the muesli i just bought my daughter 🙂

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Hi Jiujitsuguy,
    Congratulations on making this important change to improve your health. Making changes in any endeavor can be challenging. Your body may be kicking and screaming for foods you used to eat. But the good news is that once your symptoms are under control, you may be able to introduce some of these foods in smaller amounts. In the meantime, your body will likely adjust to this new normal which is less sugar and other fermentable carbs. Consuming more fats, proteins and low FP carbs can help prevent weight loss.

    trumpet
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Hi Norm and greetings to other Fast Track Dieters,
    It has been 3 months now since I started the FTD. (See July 9th entry above). It was sometimes tough, but not terribly tough. Maybe the hardest part was being hungry all the time. You just have to eat many times a day. It hasn’t been too hard to resist favorite carbo-filled foods of the past. The biggest motivation to carry on has been to get rid of those horrible upper respiratory symptoms that strongly reduced the quality of my life and threatened to shorten my career as a profi-trumpeter. For those who are interested, here is a brief summary of my experience until now: Shortly after I bought the book and started the diet, I also booked consultations with Norm. They were very helpful and inspired me to keep at it. Although small, the first improvement came after about ten days. Then it stayed the same for about another two weeks. On Aug. 7th there was suddenly a very noticeable improvement. The reflux was not so often, and mostly in the morning. My sinuses were problem free, but I still had a sore throat and my lungs were not completely free. Around this time I had four sessions with an Osteopath over the next two weeks. He massaged and adjusted my diaphragm, stomach and LES. I really believe that that helped a bit.
    My orchestra season started in the middle of Aug. but I was still having frequent reflux until 1 PM or so. My throat was no longer very sore but very red and often feeling hot. My symptoms stayed the same for about another 4 weeks, but I started to notice that my reflux was not really acidic anymore. It was pepsin or bile. Around the end of September came another improvement. My lungs were completely free! Also my throat was less red with no more hotness. Plus I have less frequent reflux, even in the morning. I feel good and relieved. My life has returned to normal except without the carbs. I lost 24 pounds in the process, but my weight has stabilized at about 150. I still stick mostly to the lower FP’s but have slowly started to add some moderate ones in the last week or so without any problems. The bottom line is the Fast Track Diet has worked for me.
    Thanks again Norm! And to my fellow FTDers, stick with the low FP’s and don’t give up!
    Tom S.
    P.S. Extra Tip! Look for low-carb soy flour wafer-like crackers to put cheese and coldcuts between and lots of baggies filled with nuts for when you are out of the house!

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Congratulations on your tremendous progress Tom and thanks for sharing your experience. I am happy to hear that you are being rewarded with significant improvements in your health. I know respiratory or LPR symptoms take longer than simple reflux to gain control over, but I am convinced that sticking with the program is the key. Your experience attests to this. As I have mentioned, extra dietary fats might work together with low FP starches and veggies to help put on some extra weight.

    twinkle2010
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    Hello Dr. Robillard,

    Before reading your book I had weaned myself off of omrepazole which was not an easy task. I had read up on long term side affects of usage of it. I started to see my asthma sysmptoms flare up once I stopped using the omprepazole.
    I then came across your book and read it. I started the eating plan for digestion a few weeks ago. I see a big difference in the way I feel as far as the symptoms of my sliding hiatel hernia. However, my asthma still seems to be acting up. I have to clear my throat a lot throughout the day, so much so that my throat feels raw. And I have a dry cough and some tightness in my chest. (My asthma has been well controlled for many years. Once a year I would have a flare up when I would get a cold) All this started when I went off of the omprepazole. My asthma Dr. wants me go back on omrepazole. She says to keep my asthma under control I need to go back on omrepazole. She has told me that my asthma affects my sliding hiatel hernia and vice versa. I really don’t want to do that. Do you have any suggestions that I may try to relieve the symptoms without going back on omrepazole? Thank you! Yvonne

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 441

    Hi Yvonne,
    Thanks for reading my book and posting on the site. Whether to continue taking omeprazole or not is a decision for you and your doctor. However you might want to share my blog article on GERD and asthma (https://digestivehealthinstitute.org/2010/08/07/the-connection-between-gerd-and-asthma/) with your doctor. Here is a quote from the article:
    “In an attempt to understand the connection between GERD and asthma, large multicenter studies were conducted to determine if treatment of GERD with potent PPI drugs would reduce asthma symptoms and improve lung function in poorly controlled asthmatics that had GERD or silent GERD. Studies with the PPI drugs lansoprazole and esomeprazole were conducted to determine if the treatment of GERD with these drugs would have a positive impact on asthma. In each case, the drugs did not improve asthma symptoms or lung function (44,45).”
    There is no evidence that PPI drugs help with asthma, so why do doctors keep prescribing them for this condition?

    It’s possible that more time will be needed for the diet to improve your asthma and throat symptoms. This has been noted by several people using the diet for LPR. I am convinced – based on the fact that fundoplication operations improve asthma – that stopping the reflux with the Fast Tract Diet is a solid approach. However, to be fair, there have been no definitive clinical studies to prove my supposition.

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