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  • ronnie
    Participant
    Post count: 18

    Hi Norm, First-time poster, and just starting the diet in hopes of weaning off of PPIs for two years. Thank you SO MUCH for writing it. I am optimistic.

    So..what got me to your site in the first place was my wife and I moving toward a low gluten diet. I had purchased a couple of different wheat flours based on ‘ancient grains’ such as Emmer and Turkey Red. These were cited in the book “Wheat Belly” has having about 2% as much gluten as modern wheat varieties. However, when I was researching recipes for baking breads with them, some of the recipes called for tapioca starch or corn starch. THAT is when I found your site – discussing the RS issue.

    Long-winded way of saying that – I would love to find some type of bread that is somewhat edible/healthy (sorry – Tastee white bread doesn’t cut it for me – I’d rather go without) occasionally. Thoughts?

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Hi Ronnie and welcome to the site. I like where you’re going with this. I am all for finding new breads that contain less of the things that can trigger GI symptoms. And it’s likely not just gluten. Breads with less resistant starch, fructans and inulin would also be great. The middle east flat bread mentioned in the book may be one low FP possibility to explore.

    Making bread by adding tapioca is also a great idea. The grains table in FTD IBS (now added to FTD Heartburn in the ebook and soon to follow in the print book) lists tapioca but the FP was updated to correct a typo. The GI is actually 81 (not 46 as originally reported) and the FP is only 5 grams for a 1.1 ounce serving!

    I can’t find a glycemic index for corn starch (if anyone can find it, please post!), so would try it as more of an experiment once your symptoms are under control.

    Norm Robillard
    Keymaster
    Post count: 438

    Hi Ronnie and welcome to the site. I like where you’re going with this. I am all for finding new breads that contain less of the things that can trigger GI symptoms. And it’s likely not just gluten. Breads with less resistant starch, fructans and inulin would also be great. The middle east flat bread mentioned in the book may be one low FP possibility to explore.

    Making bread by adding tapioca is also a great idea. The grains table in FTD IBS (now added to FTD Heartburn in the ebook and soon to follow in the print book) lists tapioca but the FP was updated to correct a typo. The GI is actually 81 (not 46 as originally reported) and the FP is only 5 grams for a 1.1 ounce serving!

    I can’t find a glycemic index for corn starch (if anyone can find it, please post!), so would try it as more of an experiment once your symptoms are under control.

    danb1
    Participant
    Post count: 18

    Jumping on this old post, I was wondering whether how the bread is cooked affects the resistance of the starches somehow. For example adding yeast for fermentation would break down some of the starchyness. Is there any scientific argument for this being the best way to approach this? My instinctive guess is that sourdough bread would be the most digestible form of bread as it has been highly fermented. And for that reason, flatbread (even those made with high GI flour) would contain more hard to digest starch than yeast based flours.

    Be interesting to get an opinion.
    I want bread too!!
    I’m going to experiment with a yeast based Tapioca/Almond flour mixture blend in the meantime.

    ftder
    Participant
    Post count: 210

    I believe Norm lists sourdough bread as an option in the sample menu planner for the first two weeks in the IBS book? My memory serves me that in several studies, people with IBS that don’t have gluten sensitivities do well with good quality sourdough? For me, I have candida overgrowth too, so sourdough is not the best choice for me yet because of the yeast, not the FP.

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