Skip to main content

Reply To: Glucose intolerance by artifical sweeteners! Uh, oh :-/

///Reply To: Glucose intolerance by artifical sweeteners! Uh, oh :-/
Reply To: Glucose intolerance by artifical sweeteners! Uh, oh :-/2014-09-18T21:24:31+00:00

Fast Tract Diet for SIBO Forum Fast Tract Diet Q&A Glucose intolerance by artifical sweeteners! Uh, oh :-/ Reply To: Glucose intolerance by artifical sweeteners! Uh, oh :-/

Norm Robillard
Keymaster
Post count: 438

Yes, it is the one gut friendly exception. All the Fast Tract books have been updated to contain lots of information on erythritol. Here’s some similar info from the sweetener article on this site.

One sugar alcohol, erythritol, has some unique properties which makes it a good choice as an alternative sweetener (it’s not an artificial sweetener since it’s produced by yeast). Unlike the other sugar alcohols, erythritol is mostly (90%) absorbed in the small intestine. Even the 10% that remains in the intestine may not be a problem as at least one study showed gut bacteria may not be able to metabolize it[iv]. It’s also not metabolized much by the body as most of it can be recovered in urine[v]. Safety studies in animals and humans suggest that erythritol is very safe as well[vi]. Thanks to Lauren Benning for writing to me about the benefits or erythritol and Kris Gunnars for his excellent article on erythritol.

[iv]Arrigoni E, Brouns F, Amadò R. Human gut microbiota does not ferment erythritol. Br J Nutr. 2005 Nov;94(5):643-6.

[v]Hiele M, Ghoos Y, Rutgeerts P, Vantrappen G. Metabolism of erythritol in humans: comparison with glucose and lactitol. Br J Nutr. 1993 Jan;69(1):169-76.

[vi]Munro IC, Berndt WO, Borzelleca JF, Flamm G, Lynch BS, Kennepohl E, Bär EA, Modderman J. Erythritol: an interpretive summary of biochemical, metabolic, toxicological and clinical data. Food Chem Toxicol. 1998 Dec;36(12):1139-74.